Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Paravertebral Block Versus Preemptive Ketamine Effect on Pain Intensity after Posterolateral Thoracotomies: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Version 1 : Received: 6 February 2020 / Approved: 7 February 2020 / Online: 7 February 2020 (09:28:16 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Borys, M.; Hanych, A.; Czuczwar, M. Paravertebral Block Versus Preemptive Ketamine Effect on Pain Intensity after Posterolateral Thoracotomies: A Randomized Controlled Trial. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 793. Borys, M.; Hanych, A.; Czuczwar, M. Paravertebral Block Versus Preemptive Ketamine Effect on Pain Intensity after Posterolateral Thoracotomies: A Randomized Controlled Trial. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 793.

Journal reference: J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 793
DOI: 10.3390/jcm9030793

Abstract

Severe postoperative pain affects most patients after thoracotomy and is a risk factor for post-thoracotomy pain syndrome (PTPS). This randomized controlled trial compared preemptively administered ketamine versus paravertebral block (PVB) versus control in patients undergoing posterolateral thoracotomy. The primary outcome was acute pain intensity on the visual analog scale (VAS) on the first postoperative day. Secondary outcomes included morphine consumption, patient satisfaction, and PTPS assessment with Neuropathic Pain Syndrome Inventory (NPSI). Acute pain intensity was significantly lower with PVB compared to other groups at four out of six time points. Patients in the PVB group used significantly less morphine via a patient-controlled analgesia pump than participants in other groups. Moreover, patients were more satisfied with postoperative pain management after PVB. PVB, but not ketamine, decreased PTPS intensity at 1, 3, and 6 months after posterolateral thoracotomy. Acute pain intensity at hour 8 and PTPS intensity at month 3 correlated positively with PTPS at month 6. Bodyweight was negatively associated with chronic pain at month 6. Thus, PVB but not preemptively administered ketamine decreases both acute and chronic pain intensity following posterolateral thoracotomies. The trial was prospectively registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (https://www.anzctr.org.au/; ACTRN12616000900415; 07 July 2016).

Subject Areas

Ketamine; Paravertebral block; Posterolateral thoracotomy; Thoracotomy; Visual analog scale

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.