Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Microphone and Loudspeaker Array Signal Processing to Build a "Radiation Keyboard" for Authentic Samplers

Version 1 : Received: 6 January 2020 / Approved: 7 January 2020 / Online: 7 January 2020 (10:27:54 CET)

How to cite: Ziemer, T.; Plath, N. Microphone and Loudspeaker Array Signal Processing to Build a "Radiation Keyboard" for Authentic Samplers. Preprints 2020, 2020010055 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202001.0055.v1). Ziemer, T.; Plath, N. Microphone and Loudspeaker Array Signal Processing to Build a "Radiation Keyboard" for Authentic Samplers. Preprints 2020, 2020010055 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202001.0055.v1).

Abstract

To date electric pianos and samplers tend to concentrate on authenticity in terms of temporal and spectral aspects of sound. They barely recreate the original sound radiation characteristics, contribute to the perception of width and depth, vividness and voice separation, especially for instrumentalists, who are located in the near field. This paper describes an operational procedure to measure, store, and synthesize the complete sound of a harpsichord, including its spatial sound radiation characteristics. First, actuators excite the instrument at the intersection point of each string with the bridge with an exponential sine-sweep. Then, the radiated sound field is recorded in the near and the far field with microphone arrays. The pressure distribution in the near field is propagated back to the soundboard of the instrument, using Minimum Energy Method. The vibration of each single string is captured with lightweight contact microphones. The soundboard is then replaced by an array of 128 loudspeakers. The loudspeaker signal is a convolution of the back-propagated sweep recording with the string recording to perform a wave field synthesis. Above the spatial Nyquist frequency, the Radiation Method is applied to perform a sound field synthesis which is valid for the listening region of the instrumentalist. The result is an electric harpsichord, that approximates the sound of a real harpsichord precisely in time, frequency, and space domain. Applications for such a radiation keyboard are music performance, instrument and synthesizer building and interactive psychoacoustic research.

Subject Areas

microphone array; wave field synthesis; acoustic holography; sampler; synthesizer

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