Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Retraining and Nutritional Strategy of an Elite Master Athlete Following Hip Arthroplasty: A Case Study

Version 1 : Received: 4 December 2019 / Approved: 5 December 2019 / Online: 5 December 2019 (11:54:46 CET)

How to cite: Louis, J.; Tiollier, E.; Lamb, A.; Bontemps, B.; Areta, J.; Bernard, T. Retraining and Nutritional Strategy of an Elite Master Athlete Following Hip Arthroplasty: A Case Study. Preprints 2019, 2019120073 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201912.0073.v1). Louis, J.; Tiollier, E.; Lamb, A.; Bontemps, B.; Areta, J.; Bernard, T. Retraining and Nutritional Strategy of an Elite Master Athlete Following Hip Arthroplasty: A Case Study. Preprints 2019, 2019120073 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201912.0073.v1).

Abstract

The purpose of this case study was to evaluate the benefits that evidence-based nutritional and training recommendations could have on the time course of reconditioning following hip arthroplasty in a competitive master triathlete. Methods: During 38 weeks (from 6 weeks prior to surgery through to the return to competition), the athlete was provided with detailed training and nutritional recommendations based on the latest research evidence. Dietary intake (via the remote food photographic method), body composition (via DXA), peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), peak power output (PPO) and cycling efficiency (GE) were assessed 6 weeks pre- and 8, 12, 18, 21 and 25-weeks post-surgery. Training load was quantified (TRIMP score) daily during the retraining. Results: Total body mass increased by 8.2 kg (attributable to a 3.5 and 4.6 kg increase in fat mass and lean mass, respectively) between week -6 and week 8 despite a reduction in carbohydrate (CHO) intake post-surgery (<3.0g/kg/day). This was accompanied with a decrease in VO2peak, PPO, and GE due to a drop in training load. From week 7, the athlete resumed training and was advised to gradually increase CHO intake according to the demands of training. Conclusions: Eventually the athlete was able to return to competition in week 32 with a higher PPO, improved VO2peak and GE. Throughout retraining, energy availability was maintained around 30 kcal/kg LBM/day, protein intake was high while CHO intake was periodised. Such dietary conditions allowed the athlete to maintain and even increase lean mass, which represents a major challenge with ageing.

Subject Areas

body composition; triathlon; ageing; energy availability; macronutrients; performance; protein; carbohydrate

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