Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Students with Socioeconomic Disadvantages who have Academic Success in Language: Examining Academic Resilience in South America

Version 1 : Received: 3 December 2019 / Approved: 4 December 2019 / Online: 4 December 2019 (08:00:35 CET)

How to cite: Salvo-Garrido, S.; Miranda Vargas, H.; Vivallo Urra, O.; Gálvez-Nieto, J.L.; Miranda-Zapata, E. Students with Socioeconomic Disadvantages who have Academic Success in Language: Examining Academic Resilience in South America. Preprints 2019, 2019120043 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201912.0043.v1). Salvo-Garrido, S.; Miranda Vargas, H.; Vivallo Urra, O.; Gálvez-Nieto, J.L.; Miranda-Zapata, E. Students with Socioeconomic Disadvantages who have Academic Success in Language: Examining Academic Resilience in South America. Preprints 2019, 2019120043 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201912.0043.v1).

Abstract

Framed in a context with an emerging economy and with a high percentage of school failure, this study aimed to identify the factors that turn students with socioeconomic disadvantages into resilient students. Two questions guided the research: Can resilience be supported in students in adverse socioeconomic situations? What factors influence building resilient students? A cross-sectional study was carried out from 2011 to 2015 in Chile, using a multilevel logistic regression model with three levels, considering the hierarchical data structure. The behavior of 63100 to 76400 sampled students was analyzed. Results show five relevant factors in building resilience: self-efficacy in language, minor aggressions and violence perceived by students, norms and values of the establishment, interest in study, and self-efficacy. Some risk factors identified were an atmosphere of less respect and trust, engagement in physical education activities and good performance in carrying them out. These results could orient educational leaders interested in supporting the educational community in order to improve the academic success of disadvantaged students.

Subject Areas

socio-educational resilience; protective factors; risk factors; multilevel logistic model, simce

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