Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Extending the Models of Employee Turnover to Include External Drivers such as Client-related Factors: A Multi-country, Qualitative Assessment

Version 1 : Received: 27 November 2019 / Approved: 28 November 2019 / Online: 28 November 2019 (11:22:28 CET)

How to cite: Radford, K.; Stephenson, A.L. Extending the Models of Employee Turnover to Include External Drivers such as Client-related Factors: A Multi-country, Qualitative Assessment. Preprints 2019, 2019110362 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201911.0362.v1). Radford, K.; Stephenson, A.L. Extending the Models of Employee Turnover to Include External Drivers such as Client-related Factors: A Multi-country, Qualitative Assessment. Preprints 2019, 2019110362 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201911.0362.v1).

Abstract

The employee turnover literature to date is teeming with process models that assume only organizational and personal factors contribute to employees’ intentions to leave and stay. However, with the average percentage variance explained still only around 50%, it is clear that other factors play a substantial role in these decision-making processes. One possible explanation is to explore the unique role that clients play in employees’ intentions to stay or leave. This paper extends the conceptualization of the role that clients play on employee’s intentions to stay and leave their roles, particularly within service industries such as health care. This paper presents the results of two qualitative studies that examine employees’ decision-making process for turnover and retention intentions. The first study explores the factors influencing employees’ intentions to stay and leave the Australian aged care sector (N = 420) and the second study explores prison health care nurses in the United States (N = 175). The results of both studies reveal that client-related factors affect the choice to stay within a job and, in some cases, are the favoured aspect of the role. Therefore encouraging client-staff relationships will expand job satisfaction and therefore increase retention of employees within both contexts.

Subject Areas

employee retention; employee turnover; client embeddedness; human resource management

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