Working Paper Brief Report Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Natural Latent Toxoplasmosis in Wild and Captivity-born Olive Baboons (Papio Anubis) in Kenya

Version 1 : Received: 25 November 2019 / Approved: 26 November 2019 / Online: 26 November 2019 (11:47:45 CET)

How to cite: Kamau, D.; Kagira, J.; Karanja, M.; Ngotho, M.; Naomi, M.; Mokua, J. Natural Latent Toxoplasmosis in Wild and Captivity-born Olive Baboons (Papio Anubis) in Kenya. Preprints 2019, 2019110316 Kamau, D.; Kagira, J.; Karanja, M.; Ngotho, M.; Naomi, M.; Mokua, J. Natural Latent Toxoplasmosis in Wild and Captivity-born Olive Baboons (Papio Anubis) in Kenya. Preprints 2019, 2019110316

Abstract

Toxoplasmosis is a neglected anthropozoonosis caused by the obligate intracellular protozoan, Toxoplasma gondii. The role of non-human primates in the epidemiology of human toxoplasmosis is not clear. Acute and highly fatal cases of toxoplasmosis are frequently reported in new world monkeys and asymptomatic infections in old world monkeys. Here we report detection of latent natural T. gondii infection in olive baboons during a screening exercise to select animals for an experimental toxoplasmosis study. Archived serum samples from 32 olive baboons (Papio anubis), 23 wild caught and nine colony-born, were screened for T. gondii DNA using nested PCR. Eighteen (56.25%) samples were from females and fourteen (43.75%) from males. Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected in 21 (65.6%) baboons. 13 females (40. 6%) and eight males (25%). Five baboons (24%) which tested positive were from the Institute of Primate Research colony but there was no statistical significance between them and the wild trapped (p=0.453). There was neither statistical significance (p=0.373) between sex and infection status nor between area of origin and infection status (p>0.05). These results indicate that olive baboons get infected with T. gondii in the wild and during captivity and may be significant reservoirs of human infections, especially where they may be trapped for bushmeat. We recommend a country-wide study to establish true prevalence of toxoplasmosis among non-human primates and identify associated parasite strains.

Subject Areas

Toxoplasmosis; Toxoplasma gondii; nested PCR; non-human primates; Olive baboons

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