Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Comparative Health-Related Fatty Acid Profiles, Atherogenicity and Desaturase Indices of Marula Seed Cake Products from South Africa and Eswatini

Version 1 : Received: 11 November 2019 / Approved: 12 November 2019 / Online: 12 November 2019 (16:25:03 CET)

How to cite: Mthiyane, D.M.N.; Hugo, A. Comparative Health-Related Fatty Acid Profiles, Atherogenicity and Desaturase Indices of Marula Seed Cake Products from South Africa and Eswatini. Preprints 2019, 2019110132 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201911.0132.v1). Mthiyane, D.M.N.; Hugo, A. Comparative Health-Related Fatty Acid Profiles, Atherogenicity and Desaturase Indices of Marula Seed Cake Products from South Africa and Eswatini. Preprints 2019, 2019110132 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201911.0132.v1).

Abstract

Marula seed cake (MSC) is a nutritionally-rich natural feed resource that can enhance the healthiness of animal-derived foods (ADFs) for human consumption. This study compared the health-related fatty acid (FA) profiles of MSC products from South Africa and Eswatini. Composite samples monthly collected from both countries were analysed for FAs. MSC products from both countries were found to be dominated by oleic acid (>70%), followed by palmitic, linoleic and stearic acids. Consequently, both products had their FA totals dominated by ƩMUFA followed by ƩSFA, ƩPUFA, Ʃn-6 PUFA and Ʃn-3 PUFA. Both oleic and stearic acids were higher (P < 0.01) whilst linoleic (P < 0.001), α-linolenic (P < 0.05), margaric (P < 0.05), palmitoleic (P < 0.05) and eicosatrienoic (P < 0.05) acids were lower in South African in comparison to Eswatini MSC. Consequently, South African MSC had higher ƩMUFA (P < 0.01) but lower ƩPUFA (P < 0.001), Ʃn-6 PUFA (P < 0.001) and Ʃn-3 PUFA (P < 0.05). Also, Eswatini MSC had higher n-6 : n-3 PUFA, PUFA : SFA (P = 0.001) and PUFA : MUFA (P < 0.05) ratios. Further, MSC products from both countries had similarly (P > 0.05) low atherogenicity and high desaturase indices. In conclusion, both country products are rich particularly in oleic acid and their incorporation into farm animal diets would increase content of the MUFA in ADFs and, consequently, improve health benefits to human consumers.

Subject Areas

marula; seed (kernel) cake; fatty acids; fatty acid totals; fatty acid ratios; atherogenicity and desaturase indices

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