Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Impact of Aerosol-Cloud Cycling on Aqueous Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

Version 1 : Received: 26 September 2019 / Approved: 29 September 2019 / Online: 29 September 2019 (02:50:17 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Tsui, W.G.; Woo, J.L.; McNeill, V.F. Impact of Aerosol-Cloud Cycling on Aqueous Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation. Atmosphere 2019, 10, 666. Tsui, W.G.; Woo, J.L.; McNeill, V.F. Impact of Aerosol-Cloud Cycling on Aqueous Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation. Atmosphere 2019, 10, 666.

Journal reference: Atmosphere 2019, 10, 666
DOI: 10.3390/atmos10110666

Abstract

Chemical processing of organic material in aqueous atmospheric aerosols and cloudwater is known to form secondary organic aerosols (SOA), although the extent to which each of these processes contributes to total aerosol mass is unclear. In this study, we use GAMMA 5.0, a photochemical box model with coupled gas and aqueous-phase chemistry, to consider the impact of aqueous organic reactions in both aqueous aerosols and clouds on isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) SOA over a range of pH for both aqueous phases, including cycling between cloud and aerosol within a single simulation. Low-pH aqueous aerosol, in the absence of organic coatings or other morphology which may limit uptake of IEPOX, is found to be an efficient source of IEPOX SOA, consistent with previous work. Cloudwater at pH 4 or lower is also found to be a potentially significant source of IEPOX SOA. This phenomenon is primarily attributed to the relatively high uptake of IEPOX to clouds as a result of higher water content in clouds as compared to aerosol. For more acidic cloudwater, the aqueous organic material is comprised primarily of IEPOX SOA and lower-volatility organic acids. For both cloudwater and aqueous aerosol, pH is the most significant factor considered in this study in determining the mass of aqueous phase organic acids and IEPOX SOA. Other factors, such as the time of day or sequence of aerosol-to-cloud or cloud-to-aerosol transitions, contribute to less than 15% difference in the final aqSOA fractional composition. The potential significance of cloud processing as a contributor to IEPOX SOA production could account for discrepancies between predicted IEPOX SOA mass from atmospheric models and measured ambient IEPOX SOA mass, or observations of IEPOX SOA in locations where mass transfer limitations are expected in aerosol particles.

Subject Areas

secondary organic aerosol; isoprene epoxydiol; aqueous aerosol; cloudwater

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