Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

The ex-situ immobilization experiment of heavy metals in dredged marine sediments from Bohai Bay, China

Version 1 : Received: 18 September 2019 / Approved: 19 September 2019 / Online: 19 September 2019 (11:24:05 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Zhang, W.; Wang, X.; Liu, B. An Ex-Situ Immobilization Experiment with Zn, Pb, and Cu in Dredged Marine Sediments from Bohai Bay, China. J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7, 394. Zhang, W.; Wang, X.; Liu, B. An Ex-Situ Immobilization Experiment with Zn, Pb, and Cu in Dredged Marine Sediments from Bohai Bay, China. J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7, 394.

Journal reference: J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7, 394
DOI: 10.3390/jmse7110394

Abstract

The remediation of dredged marine sediments contaminated by heavy metals has drawn increasing attention worldly. The immobilization was regarded as a promising method to reduce adverse impacts on marine ecosystem. In this study, kaolinite and limestone were used as amendments to immobilize heavy metals (e.g. Zn, Pb and Cu) respectively in dredged marine sediments collected from the coastal zone adjacent to Tianjin Port in Bohai Bay. The sequential extraction procedure was applied to identify the mobility of heavy metals and further to evaluate the immobilization effect of amendments. The physical-chemical properties of sediments, such as pH, electrical conductivity (EC), salinity, and total organic carbon (TOC), were also measured to better understand their influence on heavy metals’ mobility. In addition, the compositions of clay minerals were also analyzed to identify the transformation process of minerals in the sediments. The results of sequential extraction procedure indicated that mobile fractions of heavy metals were converted into relatively stable fractions because of the two amendments. In addition, EC, salinity and TOC decreased moderately while no obvious variations of pH in the sediments were observed with the addition of the the kaolinite and the limestone. The percentage of montmorillonite decreased to minimum value while that of chlorite increased gradually during the experimental periods for 40 days probably due to complexation reaction. It was confirmed that both kaolinite and limestone can effectively reduce the mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals, particularly for Zn, generally, limestone has a better immobilization effect compared with kaolinite.

Subject Areas

dredged marine sediment; heavy metal; immobilization; kaolinite; limestone

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