Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Contributions of the Left- and the Right-Hemisphere on the Language-Induced Grip Force Modulation of the Left Hand in Unimanual Task

Version 1 : Received: 8 July 2019 / Approved: 10 July 2019 / Online: 10 July 2019 (07:37:58 CEST)

How to cite: da Silva, R.L.; Santos, F.F.; Mendes, I.M.G..; Caromano, F.A.; Higgins, J.; Frak, V. Contributions of the Left- and the Right-Hemisphere on the Language-Induced Grip Force Modulation of the Left Hand in Unimanual Task. Preprints 2019, 2019070139 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201907.0139.v1). da Silva, R.L.; Santos, F.F.; Mendes, I.M.G..; Caromano, F.A.; Higgins, J.; Frak, V. Contributions of the Left- and the Right-Hemisphere on the Language-Induced Grip Force Modulation of the Left Hand in Unimanual Task. Preprints 2019, 2019070139 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201907.0139.v1).

Abstract

Background and objectives: The language-induced grip force modulation (GFM) can be used to better understand the link between the language and motor functions as an expression of the embodied language. However, the contribution of each brain hemisphere to the language-induced GFM is still unclear. Using six different action verbs as stimuli, this study evaluated the GFM of the left hand in unimanual task to characterize the left- and right-hemisphere contributions. Materials and Methods: The left-hand GFM of 20 healthy consistent right-handers subjects was evaluated using the verbs “to write”, “to hold”, “to pull”(left-lateralized central processing actions), “to draw”, “to tie”, and “to drive” (bi-hemispheric central processing actions) as linguistic stimuli. The time between the word onset and the first interval of statistical significance regarding the baseline (RT) was also measured. Results: The six verbs produced language-induced GFM. The modulation intensity was similar for the six verbs, but the RT was variable. The verbs “to draw”, “to tie”, and “to drive”, whose central processing of the described action is bihemispheric showed a longer Rt compared to the other verbs. Conclusions: The possibility that an action is performed by the left-hand does not interfere with the occurrence of GFM when this action verb is employed as linguistic stimulus. Therefore, the language-induced GFM seems mainly rely on the left hemisphere, and the engagement of the right hemisphere seems to slow down the increase in the GFM intensity.

Subject Areas

grip force modulation; embodied language; left hand; right hemisphere; left hemisphere; unimanual task

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