Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Lesson Learnt from Peer Volunteers in a Peer-Led Pain Management Program among Nursing Home Residents

Version 1 : Received: 27 June 2019 / Approved: 28 June 2019 / Online: 28 June 2019 (15:43:27 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Tse, M.M.Y.; Ng, S.S.M.; Bai, X.; Lee, P.H.; Lo, R.; Cheung, D.; Cheung, K.; Yeung, S.S.Y. Lesson Learned from Peer Volunteers in a Peer-Led Pain Management Program among Nursing Home Residents. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3097. Tse, M.M.Y.; Ng, S.S.M.; Bai, X.; Lee, P.H.; Lo, R.; Cheung, D.; Cheung, K.; Yeung, S.S.Y. Lesson Learned from Peer Volunteers in a Peer-Led Pain Management Program among Nursing Home Residents. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3097.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3097
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph16173097

Abstract

Abstract Background: Chronic pain is common among older adults and is associated with adverse physical and psychological outcomes. Given the expected burden and limited healthcare resources, an innovative and cost-effective method to manage chronic pain should be developed. Peer volunteers (PVs) have been used as an affordable alternative to professional services to help patients manage their chronic conditions including pain with success and acceptance. The aim of this paper is to explore the experiences and perceptions of PVs in a peer-led pain management program among nursing home residents. Methods: This longitudinal study formed part of a wider research study, a clustered randomised controlled trial, which investigates the effectiveness of a 12-week peer-led pain management program (PAP) in relieving chronic pain and enhancing pain self-efficacy among nursing home residents. Quantitative data were collected from questionnaires (demographics, pain situation and pain knowledge) for all PVs. Qualitative data (PVs’ experiences in leading the PAP, their perceived benefits, limitations and barriers encountered, its usefulness to the participants and recommendations for improving the PAP) were collected from focus group for a selected sample at baseline (before attending the training) and at week 12 (upon completion of the PAP). Data were analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences and NVivo 8. Results: A total of 46 PVs were recruited (34 female, 74%), with mean±SD age of 61.0±5.1 years. Thirty-one PVs reported to have chronic pain. Before the training, self-rated pain knowledge was 39.1±20.4 (maximum 100 points). When actual pain knowledge was assessed, a mean pain knowledge score of 86.1±10.6 points was found. There was a significant difference between the self-rated pain knowledge and the pain knowledge score (p<0.001). PVs reported to have improvement in their knowledge and skills. No PVs reported negative comments regarding their role in the PAP, although experienced barriers such as communication, space and privacy were reported. Conclusions: This study provides further evidence that peer-led pain management program is feasible. Barriers identified may benefit the design and planning of future PAP. Trial registration: ClincalTrials.gov (NCT03823495), 30 January 2019. (Retrospectively registered).

Subject Areas

volunteer; peer groups; pain management; nursing homes

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