Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Health Crisis in Rural Nepal due to the Shortage of Health Professionals: Challenges, Solutions, and the Role of the International Community

Version 1 : Received: 13 March 2019 / Approved: 14 March 2019 / Online: 14 March 2019 (12:16:13 CET)

How to cite: Shrestha, B.; Shrestha, B. Health Crisis in Rural Nepal due to the Shortage of Health Professionals: Challenges, Solutions, and the Role of the International Community. Preprints 2019, 2019030154 Shrestha, B.; Shrestha, B. Health Crisis in Rural Nepal due to the Shortage of Health Professionals: Challenges, Solutions, and the Role of the International Community. Preprints 2019, 2019030154

Abstract

Nepal, considered one of the poorest and underdeveloped nations in the world, has a particularly pronounced health crisis in its rural areas due to extreme shortages of health professionals. Home to 80% of the total population, the rural parts of Nepal are estimated to have a physician ratio of 2.4 physicians per 100 000 people (1), about 100 times lower than the minimum acceptable ratio provided by the World Health Organization (6, WHO 2006). The challenges of the mountainous topography of this Himalayan nation are further compounded by the disastrous scarcity of health professionals, viz. doctors, nurses, public health and biomedical researchers, etc. Consequently, simple and easily treatable diseases such as diarrhea, cholera, etc. take the lives of thousands of Nepali villagers every year. The health status and quality of life along with other grave problems such as poverty, illiteracy, and lack of infrastructures of development are worse in rural areas around the world, especially in developing nations such as Nepal compared to urban areas in developed nations (13, 18). Health crisis, underdevelopment, and poverty entangle rural areas in developing nations in a vicious circle, each contributing to the other, in which ill-health of rural residents negatively affects their productivity, economic output, socio-cultural contributions, and participation in the competitive world of globalization. The health crisis in rural parts of Nepal exists due to the extreme shortage of health professionals resulting from their preferences for working in urban cities in Nepal and in other developed nations, is caused by an intricate fabric of domestic push factors and international pull factors and can only be addressed through sustained cooperation between the national and international bodies.

Subject Areas

Public health, medicine, rural health, health crisis, health professionals

Readers' Comments and Ratings (0)

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.