Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Moraxella nonliquefaciens and M. osloensis are Important Moraxella Species that Cause Ocular Infections

Version 1 : Received: 1 February 2019 / Approved: 6 February 2019 / Online: 6 February 2019 (06:27:07 CET)

How to cite: LaCroce, S.; Wilson, M.N.; Romanowski, J.E.; Newman, J.D.; Jhanji, V.; Shanks, R.M.; Kowalski, R.P. Moraxella nonliquefaciens and M. osloensis are Important Moraxella Species that Cause Ocular Infections. Preprints 2019, 2019020020 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201902.0020.v1). LaCroce, S.; Wilson, M.N.; Romanowski, J.E.; Newman, J.D.; Jhanji, V.; Shanks, R.M.; Kowalski, R.P. Moraxella nonliquefaciens and M. osloensis are Important Moraxella Species that Cause Ocular Infections. Preprints 2019, 2019020020 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201902.0020.v1).

Abstract

Purpose. Moraxella is an ocular bacterial pathogen isolated in cases of keratitis, conjunctivitis, and endophthalmitis. Gram-negative brick-shaped diplobacilli from ocular specimens, and slow growth in culture, are early indications of Moraxella ocular infection; however, identifying Moraxella to species can be complex and inconsistent. Methods. In this study, bacteria consistent with Moraxella were identified to species using: 1) DNA sequencing coupled with vancomycin susceptibility, 2) MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry, and 3) Biolog ID System. Study samples consisted of 9 ATCC Moraxella controls, 82 isolates from keratitis, 21 isolates from conjunctivitis, and 4 isolates from endophthalmitis. Results. The ATCC controls were correctly identified. For keratitis, 66 (80.5%) were identified as M. nonliquefaciens, 7 (9.0%) as M. lacunata, 5 (6%) as M. osloensis, 2 (2.5%) as Acinetobacter lwoffi, 1 (1.0%) as M. bovis/nonliquefaciens, and 1 (1.0%) as M. osloensis/nonliquefaciens. For conjunctivitis, 9 (43.0%) were identified as M. osloensis, 6 (29.0%) as M. nonliquefaciens, 3 (14.3%) as Roseomonas, 2 (9.5%) as Acinetobacter (parvus, junii), and 1 (4.5%) as M. catarrhalis/M. nonliquefaciens. From endophthalmitis, 3 of 4 of the isolates were M. nonliquefaciens. Overall, M. nonliquefaciens and M. osloensis were identified in 70% (75 of 107) and 13% (14 of 107) of cases, respectively, totaling 83% (89 of 107). Conclusions. M. nonliquefaciens and M. osloensis are important bacterial pathogens of the eye as determined by DNA sequencing, MALDI-TOF MS, and Biolog. Although Moraxella catarrhalis is a clinical pathogen, other species of Moraxella appear to have a prominent role in eye infections.

Subject Areas

Moraxella; keratitis; conjunctivitis; endophthalmitis; DNA sequencing; MALDI TOF MS; Biolog ID system

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