Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

An Econometric Assessment of the Impact of Exchange Rate Depreciation on Inflation in Nigeria (1981-2017)

Version 1 : Received: 24 January 2019 / Approved: 29 January 2019 / Online: 29 January 2019 (09:28:19 CET)

How to cite: Apeh, K.; Auwal, A.M.; Obinna, N.N. An Econometric Assessment of the Impact of Exchange Rate Depreciation on Inflation in Nigeria (1981-2017). Preprints 2019, 2019010289 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201901.0289.v1). Apeh, K.; Auwal, A.M.; Obinna, N.N. An Econometric Assessment of the Impact of Exchange Rate Depreciation on Inflation in Nigeria (1981-2017). Preprints 2019, 2019010289 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201901.0289.v1).

Abstract

The present reality of the Nigerian economy is the fact that inflation has remained unabated in spite of all exchange rate measures that have been adopted by the monetary authority. This calls for investigation into the extent to which exchange rate impact on inflation in Nigeria. The research paper examined the impact of exchange rate depreciation on inflation in Nigeria for the period 1981–2017, using Auto Regressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) Bounds Test Cointegration Procedure. The research shows that inflation rate in Nigeria is highly susceptible to lagged inflation rate, exchange rate, lagged exchange rate, lagged broad money, and lagged gross domestic product at 5% level of significance. A long run relationship was also found to exist between inflation rate, gross domestic product and general government expenditure, indicating that the model has a self-adjusting mechanism for correcting any deviation of the variables from equilibrium. Therefore, this study concludes that exchange rate is an important tool to manage inflation in the country; thus, this paper recommends that policies that have direct influence on inflation as well as exchange rate policies that would checkmate inflation movement in the country, should be used by the Central Bank of Nigeria. Also, monetary growth and import management policies should be put in place to encourage domestic production of export commodities, which are currently short-supplied. In addition, policy makers should not rely on this instrument totally to control inflation, but should use it as a complement to other macro-economic policies.

Subject Areas

Exchange rate, Inflation rate; Gross Domestic Product, Broad Money, Monetary Policy, ARDL Cointegration

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