Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

The Role of Body Weight and Growing in Body Height to Nonspecific Musculoskeletal Pain in a Cohort of Bosnia and Herzegovina Schoolchildren

Version 1 : Received: 6 November 2018 / Approved: 8 November 2018 / Online: 8 November 2018 (11:07:54 CET)

How to cite: Pranjic, N.; Azabagic, S. The Role of Body Weight and Growing in Body Height to Nonspecific Musculoskeletal Pain in a Cohort of Bosnia and Herzegovina Schoolchildren. Preprints 2018, 2018110207 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201811.0207.v1). Pranjic, N.; Azabagic, S. The Role of Body Weight and Growing in Body Height to Nonspecific Musculoskeletal Pain in a Cohort of Bosnia and Herzegovina Schoolchildren. Preprints 2018, 2018110207 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201811.0207.v1).

Abstract

Background Children often suffer the nonspecific musculosceletal pain as reported in literature. Aim To determine relationship between body weights with development of musculoskeletal pain and to determine whether growing in body height is associated with musculoskeletal pain in schoolchildren. Subjects/ Methods A prospective longitudinal study included 1315 school children aged 7-14 years (652 boys and 663 girls) and was performed in 13 elementary schools in B&H. Child body height and body weight were measured. The survey of perception of musculoskeletal pain in different body regions of subjects was conducted by adjusted Nordic Musculosceletal Questionnaire (NMQ). Results The highest prevalence of an overweight and obesity in the 10th year 35.7% and the lowest frequency 17.8% in the 14th year was. In the age 14th obesity was’nt found. Boys have more prevalence of overweight. Using logistic regression model, we found that school children with normal BMI were protected with increased body height of acute lower back pain (β= -0.089, 95%CI, -9.730- -0.023, P< 0.049), and increased body height was protector of obese school children of acute upper back pain (β= -0.356, 95%CI, -14.077- -3.878, P< 0.001) and chronic lower back pain (β= -0.356, 95%CI, -14.077- -3.878, P< 0.001). Conclusion Schoolchildren with normal weight more often have had musculosceletal pain than those with overweight or obesity. This can be associated with intense physical growth period in height, especially. The assumption is that the increase in height changes the relationship between excessive BMI and musculoskeletal pain in children of school age.

Subject Areas

musculoskeletal pain; body height; body weight; schoolchildren

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