Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Attenuated Kinetic and Kinematic Properties During Slow Versus Traditional Velocity Resistance Exercise

Version 1 : Received: 30 October 2018 / Approved: 31 October 2018 / Online: 31 October 2018 (09:01:43 CET)

How to cite: Dietz, P.; Fry, A.; Herda, T.; Cabarkapa, D.; Lane, M.; Andre, M. Attenuated Kinetic and Kinematic Properties During Slow Versus Traditional Velocity Resistance Exercise. Preprints 2018, 2018100743 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201810.0743.v1). Dietz, P.; Fry, A.; Herda, T.; Cabarkapa, D.; Lane, M.; Andre, M. Attenuated Kinetic and Kinematic Properties During Slow Versus Traditional Velocity Resistance Exercise. Preprints 2018, 2018100743 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201810.0743.v1).

Abstract

Purposely slow velocity resistance exercise (i.e., 10 s concentric and eccentric phases) is a popular training method, but limits the loads that can be lifted (e.g., <50% 1 RM). This study compared the biomechanical properties of purposely slow velocity (SLOW) and traditional resistance exercise (TRAD) that uses maximal lifting velocities. Healthy resistance-trained men (n=5) performed two testing sessions (barbell squat and bench press) in random-order; a SLOW session (1 set x 10 repetitions at 28% 1 RM, 10 s concentric & eccentric), and a TRAD session (3 x 10 at 70% 1 RM, controlled eccentric and maximal concentric). A force plate and linear position transducer were used to collect kinetic and kinematic data for every repetition of both protocols (α = 0.05). For both exercises, both concentric and eccentric mean force (N) and power (W) for each repetition was greater for TRAD. When the entire training session (squat + bench press) was examined, SLOW exhibited greater time under tension, while TRAD produced greater work (J) and impulse (N·s). Contrary to suggestions in both the lay and scientific literature, purposely slow resistance exercise produced less force, power, and work than traditional velocity resistance exercise.

Subject Areas

force, power, velocity, impulse, weight training

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