Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

The Role of Social Media in Promoting Information Disclosure on Environmental Incidents: An Evolutionary Game Theory Perspective

Version 1 : Received: 17 September 2018 / Approved: 18 September 2018 / Online: 18 September 2018 (12:44:56 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Gao, S.; Ling, S.; Liu, W. The Role of Social Media in Promoting Information Disclosure on Environmental Incidents: An Evolutionary Game Theory Perspective. Sustainability 2018, 10, 4372. Gao, S.; Ling, S.; Liu, W. The Role of Social Media in Promoting Information Disclosure on Environmental Incidents: An Evolutionary Game Theory Perspective. Sustainability 2018, 10, 4372.

Journal reference: Sustainability 2018, 10, 4372
DOI: 10.3390/su10124372

Abstract

Despite the expectation that social media use in the public sector contributes to enhancing government's transparency, few studies have been investigated whether social media use actually leads to more disclosure during environmental incidents in practice and how social media influence local governments and their officials' information disclosure. In this article, we model information disclosure during environmental incidents as an evolutionary game process between the central government and local government in social media context, and examine the internal mechanism that how social media influence the progress of information disclosure during environmental incidents. The findings indicate that social media plays an active constructive role in central-local government game relations. Specific- ally, social media can provides an efficient information channels for the central government supervise regional officials in environmental incidents, and thus improves its supervision efficiency, and it also provides an important means for internet mobilization and online-offline interaction by encouraging the public exchange information and express their views, and in turn forces local governments and their officials tend to disclosure ahead.

Subject Areas

Environmental incident; Information disclosure; Social media; Evolutionary game model

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