Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Laboratory-based Surveillance of Shigella, Its Serotype and Resistance Patternc in Johannesburg, South Africa

Version 1 : Received: 27 August 2018 / Approved: 27 August 2018 / Online: 27 August 2018 (15:08:52 CEST)

How to cite: Zulu, L.; Nyila, M. Laboratory-based Surveillance of Shigella, Its Serotype and Resistance Patternc in Johannesburg, South Africa. Preprints 2018, 2018080466 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201808.0466.v1). Zulu, L.; Nyila, M. Laboratory-based Surveillance of Shigella, Its Serotype and Resistance Patternc in Johannesburg, South Africa. Preprints 2018, 2018080466 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201808.0466.v1).

Abstract

Infectious diarrhoea such as shigellosis causes considerable morbidity and mortality, especially in infants, immune-compromised individuals and those living with HIV/AIDS. It is endemic in developing countries and in Sub-Saharan Africa, including South Africa, where diarrhoeal disease remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. This study was undertaken to establish incidences of Shigella, its serotype and resistant pattern of isolates from human faeces from residence of Johannesburg, South Africa. All stools received between January to April from the private healthcare system were cultured on Xylose Lysine Deoxycholate and MacConkey Agar and Shigella was confirmed by standard biochemical reactions and a serological method. An antimicrobial sensitivity test was used. A total of 11 009 samples from patients between 22 days to 94 years old yielded 110 Shigella isolates, of which 47 (43%) were S. flexneri, 61 (55%) were S. sonnei, 1 (1%) was S. dysenteriae and 1 (1 %) was S. boydii. The majority of patients were children between < 1 to 5 years, 76 (69%), followed by those between 6 to 10 years 13 (12%). In children up to 10 years, S. sonnei was confirmed in 52 cases (59%) and S. flexneri in 36 cases (41%). Overall, 53 (48%) males and 57 (52%) females were infected.

Subject Areas

antibiotic; diarrhea; prevalence, shigella; shigellosis

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Comment 1
Received: 24 September 2018
Commenter: Dickson Aruhomukama
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: The article is good
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