Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Review of Biomedical Applications of Contactless Imaging of Neonates using Infrared Thermography and Beyond

Version 1 : Received: 14 August 2018 / Approved: 17 August 2018 / Online: 17 August 2018 (02:27:17 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

AlZubaidi, A.K.; Ethawi, Y.; Schmölzer, G.M.; Sherif, S.; Narvey, M.; Seshia, M. Review of Biomedical Applications of Contactless Imaging of Neonates Using Infrared Thermography and Beyond. Methods Protoc. 2018, 1, 39. AlZubaidi, A.K.; Ethawi, Y.; Schmölzer, G.M.; Sherif, S.; Narvey, M.; Seshia, M. Review of Biomedical Applications of Contactless Imaging of Neonates Using Infrared Thermography and Beyond. Methods Protoc. 2018, 1, 39.

Journal reference: Methods Protoc. 2018, 1, 39
DOI: 10.3390/mps1040039

Abstract

The monitoring of sick newborns is a challenging task that health care providers in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) must contend with each day. Conventionally, newborns are monitored via probes that are affixed to their skin and attached to processing monitors (Fig.1). However, an alternative exists in contactless imaging to record such physiological signals (Physio-Markers), surface changes and internal structures which can be used independently of, or in conjunction with conventional monitors. Advantages of contactless monitoring methods include: i) quick data generation; ii) lack of contact with skin, which reduces skin breakdown and decreases risk of infection; and iii) minimizing the number of probes and monitors affixed to the skin, which allows greater body surface-area for other care. This paper is an attempt to build a foundation for and to provide a vision of the potential neonatal clinical applications of technologies that use non-contact modalities such as Visible Light Imaging (VLI), Near InfraRed Spectrum (NIRS), and Thermal Imaging (TI) using InfraRed Spectrum (IRS).

Subject Areas

NICU; Physio-features; Neonatal imaging; Infrared thermography; Optical coherence tomography; Tissue optics; Near-infrared imaging; Short-wave infrared imaging; Visible light imaging

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