Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Believing in Women? Examining Early Views of Women among America's Most Progressive Religious Groups

Version 1 : Received: 9 August 2018 / Approved: 10 August 2018 / Online: 10 August 2018 (05:08:46 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Wilde, M.J.; Al-Faham, H. Believing in Women? Examining Early Views of Women among America’s Most Progressive Religious Groups. Religions 2018, 9, 321. Wilde, M.J.; Al-Faham, H. Believing in Women? Examining Early Views of Women among America’s Most Progressive Religious Groups. Religions 2018, 9, 321.

Journal reference: Religions 2018, 9, 321
DOI: 10.3390/rel9100321

Abstract

This paper examines the most prominent “progressive” American religious groups’ (as defined by those that liberalized early on the issue of birth control, circa 1930) views of women between the first and second waves of the feminist movement (1930-1965).  We find that some groups have indeed had a long and outspoken support for women’s equality.  Using their modern-day names, these groups, the United Church of Christ, the Unitarian Universalist Church, and to a lesser extent, the Society of Friends, or Quakers, professed strong support for women’s issues, early, and often.  However, we also find that prominent progressive groups –the Protestant Episcopal Church, the Methodist Episcopal Church and the United Presbyterian Church, were virtually silent on the issue of women’s rights – even as the second wave of the feminist movement was picking up steam – as late as 1965.

Subject Areas

religion; feminism

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