Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Responding to Climate Change in Countries Emerging from Armed Conflicts: Harnessing Climate Finance to Deliver Forest Conservation, Peacebuilding, and Sustainable Food

Version 1 : Received: 7 August 2018 / Approved: 7 August 2018 / Online: 7 August 2018 (07:42:05 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Castro-Nunez, A. Responding to Climate Change in Tropical Countries Emerging from Armed Conflicts: Harnessing Climate Finance, Peacebuilding, and Sustainable Food. Forests 2018, 9, 621. Castro-Nunez, A. Responding to Climate Change in Tropical Countries Emerging from Armed Conflicts: Harnessing Climate Finance, Peacebuilding, and Sustainable Food. Forests 2018, 9, 621.

Journal reference: Forests 2018, 9, 621
DOI: 10.3390/f9100621

Abstract

Linking climate action with sustainable development goals (SDGs) might incentivize social and political support to forest conservation. However, further examination of the conceptual entry points for linking efforts for reducing forest-based emissions with those for delivering SDGs is required. This review paper aims to contribute to fulfilling this research need. It provides insights into the links between conserving forests for climate change mitigation and peacebuilding. Specifically, the paper examines opportunities to harness climate finance for conserving forests and achieving long-lasting peace. It does so via a literature review and the examination of the Orinoquia region of Colombia. Findings from the literature review suggest that harnessing climate finance for conserving forests and peacebuilding is, in theory, viable if activities are designed in accordance with social, institutional, and economic factors. Meanwhile, the Orinoquia region provides evidence that these two seemingly intractable problems are proposed to be solved together. At a time when efforts for reducing forest-based emissions are being designed and targeted at (post-) conflict areas in Colombia and elsewhere, the paper’s findings might demonstrate to government agencies — both environmental and non-environmental — the compatibility of programs aimed at reducing forest-based emissions with efforts relating to peacebuilding and sustainable food.

Subject Areas

climate finance; REDD+; forest conservation; peacebuilding; sustainable food systems

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