Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Antecedents of Statistics Anxiety in a Higher Education System

Version 1 : Received: 5 August 2018 / Approved: 6 August 2018 / Online: 6 August 2018 (08:44:19 CEST)

How to cite: Mwebesa, E.; Novembrieta, S.; Musinguzi, D. Antecedents of Statistics Anxiety in a Higher Education System. Preprints 2018, 2018080101 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201808.0101.v1). Mwebesa, E.; Novembrieta, S.; Musinguzi, D. Antecedents of Statistics Anxiety in a Higher Education System. Preprints 2018, 2018080101 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201808.0101.v1).

Abstract

This study contended that learning statistics and its rudiments were perceived as complicated compared to some other courses offered at the university level. Further, this investigation contested the existence of statistics anxiety among postgraduate students in an in-site university setting. Relationships and differences were determined in this study utilizing the constructs of antecedents of statistics anxiety namely academic procrastination, perfectionism, and gender. The objectives were (1) to establish the relationship between academic procrastination and statistics anxiety; (2) to find out the relationship between perfectionism and statistics anxiety; and (3) to investigate the differences between gender and statistics anxiety. The data from randomly selected 136 postgrad students (Kampala International University, Uganda) referring to dispositional (procrastination and perfectionism) and environmental antecedents (gender) and statistics anxiety were scientifically elicited, processed and analyzed utilizing the quantitative- post positivist’s research paradigm model. The findings revealed a positive but insignificant relationship between academic procrastination and statistics anxiety; a significant adverse correlation between perfectionism and statistics anxiety; an insignificant positive correlation existed between gender and statistics anxiety, and differences in statistics anxiety between the female and male students existed. Notably from the results then, academic procrastination did not significantly affect the students’ statistics anxiety; the students with higher levels of perfectionism tended to have lower levels of statistics anxiety while the levels of statistics anxiety among the female students were slightly greater than that of the male students.

Subject Areas

academic-procrastination; anxiety; gender; perfectionism; statistics

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