Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Dietary Disparities of Urban Chinese American Children in New York City: Results from a Pilot Study

Version 1 : Received: 3 August 2018 / Approved: 3 August 2018 / Online: 3 August 2018 (05:05:05 CEST)

How to cite: Yi, S.S.; Edens, N.; Lederer, A.; Pan, J.; Li, Y.; Kwon, S.; Beasley, J.; Trinh-Shevrin, C. Dietary Disparities of Urban Chinese American Children in New York City: Results from a Pilot Study. Preprints 2018, 2018080061 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201808.0061.v1). Yi, S.S.; Edens, N.; Lederer, A.; Pan, J.; Li, Y.; Kwon, S.; Beasley, J.; Trinh-Shevrin, C. Dietary Disparities of Urban Chinese American Children in New York City: Results from a Pilot Study. Preprints 2018, 2018080061 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201808.0061.v1).

Abstract

Obesity has been identified as an emerging health concern for Chinese American children; however, very little is known about diets in Asian American children. The objective of our paper was to describe the dietary intakes of urban Chinese American schoolchildren using a state-of-the-art approach for dietary assessment.  Data for this analysis come from the Food Journal Project 2017, a pilot and feasibility study conducted by a multi-sector collaboration. Children aged 8-12 (n=83) completed two dietary assessments using a food diary from January-June 2017. Children were then interviewed using the food diary as a guide and dietary data were entered into the online ASA24 system by study staff. Chinese American children were identified using surname, and were compared to non-Chinese peers with respect to nutrient intake and the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010). Chinese American children consumed more sodium dense diets, more protein, and less sugar compared to non-Chinese children.  With regards to the HEI-2010, Chinese American children had less favorable whole grains and sodium scores; and more favorable seafood protein and empty calories scores compared to non-Chinese children. Sodium reduction and increasing whole grain intakes may be warranted in this group, but should be verified with additional studies.

Subject Areas

Asian Americans; child; diet; eating; feeding behavior; sodium, dietary

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