Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Generation-common and -specific factors in intention to leave among female hospital nurses: A cross-sectional study using a large Japanese sample

Version 1 : Received: 25 June 2018 / Approved: 26 June 2018 / Online: 26 June 2018 (12:34:58 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Tei-Tominaga, M.; Asakura, K.; Asakura, T. Generation-Common and -Specific Factors in Intention to Leave among Female Hospital Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Study Using a Large Japanese Sample. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1591. Tei-Tominaga, M.; Asakura, K.; Asakura, T. Generation-Common and -Specific Factors in Intention to Leave among Female Hospital Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Study Using a Large Japanese Sample. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1591.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1591
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph15081591

Abstract

An understanding of the cultural conditions that determine the factors affecting nurses’ intention to leave is important for countries suffering from nurse shortage. Aim: to examine factors influencing intention to leave among female hospital nurses in a large Japanese sample, classified into four generations by age considering economic conditions. Methods: a cross-sectional survey with convenience sampling was conducted. Anonymous self-administered questionnaires were distributed to all nurses in 30 hospitals. To assess intention to leave, basic attributes, life conditions, work characteristics, and factors of psychosocial work environment were addressed. After classifying data into four generations based on age cohorts, we conducted multivariate logistic regression analysis using the completed data (N = 5,074, mean age = 36.24). Results: regardless of generational characteristics influenced by economic conditions, effort and monetary reward were generation-common factors. Over-commitment, social support, and the presence of a role model were generation-common factors in three generations. While having children increased intention to leave in the generation born 1965–1979, having family members in need of caregiving other than children decreased the risk in the generation born in the 1980s. Conclusion: generational countermeasures considering factors of psychosocial work environment and life conditions are needed to avert female nurse turnover.

Subject Areas

female, generation, hospital, intention to leave, nurse

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