Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Composition, Sources of PM2.5 Saccharides and Its Characteristics during the Haze Episode in Shanghai

Version 1 : Received: 2 June 2018 / Approved: 4 June 2018 / Online: 4 June 2018 (12:47:58 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Xiao, M.; Wang, Q.; Qin, X.; Yu, G.; Deng, C. Composition, Sources, and Distribution of PM2.5 Saccharides in a Coastal Urban Site of China. Atmosphere 2018, 9, 274. Xiao, M.; Wang, Q.; Qin, X.; Yu, G.; Deng, C. Composition, Sources, and Distribution of PM2.5 Saccharides in a Coastal Urban Site of China. Atmosphere 2018, 9, 274.

Journal reference: Atmosphere 2018, 9, 274
DOI: 10.3390/atmos9070274

Abstract

The characteristics of biogenic aerosols in urban area were explored by determining the composition, temporal distribution of saccharides in PM2.5 in Shanghai. The total saccharides showed a wide range of 15.2 ng/m3 to 1752.8 ng/m3, with the averaged concentrations were 169.8 ng/m3,300.5 ng/m3,288.4 ng/m3,688 ng/m3 in spring, summer, autumn, and winter, respectively. The concerned saccharides include anhydrosaccharides (levoglucosan and mannosan), which were higher in cold seasons due to the increased biomass burning, saccharide alcohols (mannitol, arabitol, sorbitol) and monosaccharides (fructose, glucose), which showed more abundant in warm seasons attributed to the biological emissions. By PMF analysis, four emission sources of saccharides were demonstrated, including biomass burning, fungal spores, soil suspension and plant pollens. Resolution of backward trajectory and fire points showed a process of high concentrations of levoglucosan. We found that concentrations of anhydrosaccharides showed relatively stable under different pollution levels while saccharide alcohols exhibited an obvious decrease, indicated that biomass burning was not the core reason of the heavy haze pollution, however, and high level PM2.5 pollution might inhibit effects of biological activities.

Subject Areas

saccharides; biomass burning; haze; source apportionment; bio-aerosol

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