Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

When Control Exacerbates Distress: A Qualitative Study Exploring the Experiences of Hong Kong Chinese Parents in Caring for a Child with Asthma

Version 1 : Received: 22 May 2018 / Approved: 22 May 2018 / Online: 22 May 2018 (12:21:47 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Chong, Y.-Y.; Leung, D.; Mak, Y.-W. When Control Exacerbates Distress: A Qualitative Study Exploring the Experiences of Hong Kong Chinese Parents in Caring for a Child with Asthma. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1372. Chong, Y.-Y.; Leung, D.; Mak, Y.-W. When Control Exacerbates Distress: A Qualitative Study Exploring the Experiences of Hong Kong Chinese Parents in Caring for a Child with Asthma. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1372.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1372
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph15071372

Abstract

Many parents have difficulty managing childhood asthma. In Hong Kong (HK), while medication is the primary form of treatment, traditional Chinese medicine is another favored option. In addition, HK follows a dual-track healthcare system, which may pose unique experiences for Chinese parents in childhood asthma management. This qualitative descriptive study aimed to explore the experiences of HK Chinese parents in caring for their children with asthma. Methods: Fourteen HK Chinese mothers of children (aged 3-10) suffering from asthma were purposively sampled to participate in individual, semi-structured interviews. A realist approach following conventional content analysis was used to interpret the interviews. Results: The mothers expressed feelings of uncertainty, fear of asthma crises, and searching for ways to cope. These feelings triggered various strategies to control their child’s asthma. As long as the child’s asthma symptoms recurred, the mothers’ distress continued. Their distress was sometimes exacerbated by self-doubt and worries about whether they would receive adequate support from their family and healthcare professionals. Conclusion: Helping parents to understand their limits may help them be more open to varied aspects of their caregiving experiences, and thus to cope better. Psychological interventions together traditional educational training may help to alleviate parents’ psychological difficulties.

Subject Areas

parents; children; asthma; qualitative research; psychological distress; psychological adjustment

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Received: 5 June 2018
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: this is not a paper with peer review
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