Preprint Article Version 2 This version is not peer-reviewed

The Integration of Sociality, Monoamines, and Stress Neuroendocrinology in Fish Models: Applications in the Neurosciences

Version 1 : Received: 23 April 2018 / Approved: 25 April 2018 / Online: 25 April 2018 (06:00:36 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 19 June 2018 / Approved: 19 June 2018 / Online: 19 June 2018 (10:09:33 CEST)

How to cite: Soares, M.C.; Gerlai, R.; Maximino, C. The Integration of Sociality, Monoamines, and Stress Neuroendocrinology in Fish Models: Applications in the Neurosciences. Preprints 2018, 2018040321 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201804.0321.v2). Soares, M.C.; Gerlai, R.; Maximino, C. The Integration of Sociality, Monoamines, and Stress Neuroendocrinology in Fish Models: Applications in the Neurosciences. Preprints 2018, 2018040321 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201804.0321.v2).

Abstract

Animal-focused research has been crucial for scientific advancement however, in this matter, rodents are still taking a starring role. Coming out from merely being supportive of evidence found in rodents, the use of fish models has slowly taken a more central role and expanded its overall contributions in areas such as social sciences, evolution, physiology, and recently in translational medical research. In neurosciences, zebrafish has been widely adopted, contributing to our understanding of the genetic control of brain processes, and the effects of pharmacological manipulations. However, discussion continues regarding the paradox of function versus structure, when fish and mammals are compared, and on the potentially evolutionarily conserved nature of behaviour across fish species. From the behavioural stand point we explored aversive/stress and social behaviour in selected fish models, and refer to the extensive contributions of stress and monoaminergic systems. We suggest that, in spite of marked neuroanatomical differences between fish and mammals, stress and sociality are conserved at the behavioural and molecular levels. We also suggest that stress and sociality are mediated by monoamines in predictable and non-trivial ways, and that monoamines could “bridge” the relationship between stress and social behaviour. To reconcile the level of divergence with the level of similarity, we need neuroanatomical, pharmacological, behavioural, and ecological studies conducted in the laboratory and in nature. These areas need to add to each other to enhance our understanding of fish behaviour and ultimately how this all may translate to better model systems for translational studies.

Subject Areas

neuroendocrinology; social behaviour network; mesolimbic reward system; aversive behaviour network

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