Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Uncertainty and Motivation to Seek Information from Pharmacy Automated Communications

Version 1 : Received: 12 April 2018 / Approved: 16 April 2018 / Online: 16 April 2018 (04:31:24 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Bones, M.; Nunlee, M. Uncertainty and Motivation to Seek Information from Pharmacy Automated Communications. Pharmacy 2018, 6, 47. Bones, M.; Nunlee, M. Uncertainty and Motivation to Seek Information from Pharmacy Automated Communications. Pharmacy 2018, 6, 47.

Journal reference: Pharmacy 2018, 6, 47
DOI: 10.3390/pharmacy6020047

Abstract

Pharmacy personnel often answer telephones to respond to pharmacy customers (subjects) who received messages from automated systems. This research examines the communication process in terms of how users interact and engage with pharmacies after receiving automated messages. No study has directly addressed automated telephone calls and subjects’ interactions. The purpose of this study is to test the interpersonal communication (IC) process of uncertainty in subjects in receipt of automated telephone calls from pharmacies. Subjects completed a survey of validated scales for Satisfaction (S); Relevance (R); Quality (Q); Need for Cognitive Closure (NFC). Relationships between S, R, Q, NFC, and subject preference to an automated telephone call (ATC) were analyzed to determine whether subjects contacting pharmacies display information seeking behavior. This research demonstrates that seeking information occurs if subjects: are dissatisfied with the content of the ATC; perceive that the Q of the ATC is high; perceive that the Q of ATC is high, and like receiving the ATC or with high NFC, and do not like receiving ATCs. Other interactions presented complexities amongst uncertainty and tolerance of NFC within the IC process.

Subject Areas

pharmacy; patient communication; pharmacy communications; interpersonal communications; automated telemarketing telephone calls; telephone messages; automated messages; communication theory; customer relation management; CRM; pharmacy practice

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