Preprint Article Version 1 This version not peer reviewed

Donor Human Milk Protects against Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Version 1 : Received: 11 January 2018 / Approved: 12 January 2018 / Online: 12 January 2018 (05:42:06 CET)

How to cite: Villamor-Martínez, E.; Pierro, M.; Cavallaro, G.; Mosca, F.; Kramer, B.W.; Villamor, E. Donor Human Milk Protects against Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Preprints 2018, 2018010107 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201801.0107.v1). Villamor-Martínez, E.; Pierro, M.; Cavallaro, G.; Mosca, F.; Kramer, B.W.; Villamor, E. Donor Human Milk Protects against Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Preprints 2018, 2018010107 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201801.0107.v1).

Abstract

Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common complication after preterm birth. Pasteurized donor human milk (DHM) has increasingly become the standard of care for very preterm infants over the use of preterm formula (PF) if mother’s own milk (MOM) is unavailable. Studies have reported beneficial effects of DHM on BPD. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies on the effects of DHM on BPD and other respiratory outcomes. Eighteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis of RCT’s could not demonstrate that supplementation of MOM with DHM reduced BPD when compared to PF (3 studies, risk ratio [RR] 0.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.60–1.32). However, meta-analysis of observational studies showed that DHM supplementation reduced BPD (8 studies, RR 0.78, 95% CI 0.67–0.90). An exclusive human milk diet reduced the risk of BPD, compared to a diet with PF and/or bovine milk-based fortifier (3 studies, RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.68–0.95). Feeding raw MOM, compared to feeding pasteurized MOM, protected against BPD (2 studies, RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.62–0.96). In conclusion, our data suggest that DHM protects against BPD in very preterm infants, but pasteurization of human milk reduces the benefit.

Subject Areas

donor human milk; bronchopulmonary dysplasia; breast milk; preterm formula; pasteurization

Readers' Comments and Ratings (2)

Comment 1
Received: 16 January 2018
Commenter: Renato S Procianoy
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: Please, what do you think about take in consideration the following article:

Fonseca LT, Senna DC, Silveira RC, Procianoy RS.Association between Breast Milk and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: A Single Center Observational Study.Am J Perinatol. 2017 Feb;34(3):264-269. doi: 10.1055/s-0036-1586503. Epub 2016 Aug 3.
+ Respond to this comment
Response 1 to Comment 1
Received: 17 January 2018
Commenter: Eduardo Villamor-Martinez
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: Dear Dr. Procianoy,

Thank you very much for your interest in our article and for your comment.

We considered the article you reference for inclusion, but because it did not include a group of infants who received donor human milk, it was excluded. As you mention in the article, "infants did not receive human milk from milk banks during the study period".

We are currently working on another systematic review and meta-analysis of mother's own milk and bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and we have included it in that review.

Best wishes,
Eduardo Villamor-Martinez.
Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Rate this article
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 2
Metrics 0
Leave a public comment

×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.