Preprint Communication Version 1 This version not peer reviewed

Quantitative Measurement of Hemoglobin Distribution Using Micro-Contact-Type Time-of-Flight Sensors and Noncontact Imagers Based on Spatially-Resolved Spectroscopy

Version 1 : Received: 4 January 2018 / Approved: 5 January 2018 / Online: 5 January 2018 (05:41:15 CET)

How to cite: Niwayama, M.; Kitaura, T.; Isse, T. Quantitative Measurement of Hemoglobin Distribution Using Micro-Contact-Type Time-of-Flight Sensors and Noncontact Imagers Based on Spatially-Resolved Spectroscopy. Preprints 2018, 2018010031 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201801.0031.v1). Niwayama, M.; Kitaura, T.; Isse, T. Quantitative Measurement of Hemoglobin Distribution Using Micro-Contact-Type Time-of-Flight Sensors and Noncontact Imagers Based on Spatially-Resolved Spectroscopy. Preprints 2018, 2018010031 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201801.0031.v1).

Abstract

Noncontact hemodynamic monitoring that uses cameras plays an important role in health management and diagnosis. Unfortunately, the difficulty of estimating the scattering coefficient renders the measurement accuracy of blood volume insufficient for many applications. To address this situation, this study strives to improve the accuracy of measurements of hemoglobin concentration by supplementing a micro-contact time-of-flight (TOF) sensor with a noncontact imager based on spatially-resolved spectroscopy (SRS). We use a Monte Carlo simulation based on the radiative transfer equation to examine the relationship between TOF, spatial slope, and the optical properties (absorption and scattering coefficients). The TOF and spatial slope are measured in the micro-contact area, and the absorption and scattering coefficients are determined. By applying the scattering coefficient to the SRS result measured using a camera and laser-line modules, we correct the absorption coefficients in the image. This approach assumes that the scattering coefficient remains essentially constant over the distance of several centimeters. We use this system to calculate the oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations based on the absorption coefficients at two wavelengths and obtain a one-dimensional spatial hemoglobin distribution. This simple and facile measurement technique is useful for quantitatively measuring hemoglobin distributions.

Subject Areas

near-infrared spectroscopy; hemoglobin; oximetry

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