Preprint Review Version 1 This version not peer reviewed

Ultraviolet Imaging of Volcanic Plumes: A New Paradigm in Volcanology

Version 1 : Received: 26 July 2017 / Approved: 26 July 2017 / Online: 26 July 2017 (08:57:24 CEST)

How to cite: Mcgonigle, A.J.; Pering, T.D.; Wilkes, T.C.; Tamburello, G.; D’Aleo, R.; Bitetto, M.; Aiuppa, A. Ultraviolet Imaging of Volcanic Plumes: A New Paradigm in Volcanology. Preprints 2017, 2017070076 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201707.0076.v1). Mcgonigle, A.J.; Pering, T.D.; Wilkes, T.C.; Tamburello, G.; D’Aleo, R.; Bitetto, M.; Aiuppa, A. Ultraviolet Imaging of Volcanic Plumes: A New Paradigm in Volcanology. Preprints 2017, 2017070076 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201707.0076.v1).

Abstract

Ultraviolet imaging has been applied in volcanology over the last ten years or so. This provides considerably higher temporal and spatial resolution volcanic gas emission rate data than available previously, enabling the volcanology community to investigate a range of far faster plume degassing processes, than achievable hitherto. To date this has covered rapid oscillations in passive degassing through conduits and lava lakes, as well as puffing and explosions, facilitating exciting connections to be made for the first time between previously rather separate sub disciplines of volcanology. Firstly, there has been corroboration between geophysical and degassing datasets at ≈ 1 Hz expediting more holistic investigations of volcanic source-process behaviour. Secondly, there has been the combination of surface observations of gas release, with fluid dynamic models (numerical, mathematical and laboratory) for gas flow in conduits, in attempts to link subterranean driving flow processes to surface activity types. There has also been considerable research and development concerning the technique itself, covering error analysis and most recently adaptation of smartphone sensors for this application, to deliver gas fluxes at a significantly lower instrumental price point than possible previously. At this decadal juncture in the application of UV imaging in volcanology, this article provides an overview of what has been achieved to date as well as a forward look to potential future research directions, in particular covering the first use of UV cameras to generate volcanic gas composition ratio imagery.

Subject Areas

ultraviolet cameras; volcanic plumes; interdisciplinary volcanology

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