Preprint Article Version 2 This version not peer reviewed

Arsenate-Resistant Genes in Egyptian Rice Cultivars as Soil Pollution Sensors

Version 1 : Received: 17 June 2017 / Approved: 19 June 2017 / Online: 19 June 2017 (13:49:19 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 22 June 2017 / Approved: 22 June 2017 / Online: 22 June 2017 (05:16:08 CEST)

How to cite: Hafez, E.; El. Bestawy, E.A.; Rashad, M.A.; Hassan, S. Arsenate-Resistant Genes in Egyptian Rice Cultivars as Soil Pollution Sensors. Preprints 2017, 2017060086 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201706.0086.v2). Hafez, E.; El. Bestawy, E.A.; Rashad, M.A.; Hassan, S. Arsenate-Resistant Genes in Egyptian Rice Cultivars as Soil Pollution Sensors. Preprints 2017, 2017060086 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201706.0086.v2).

Abstract

The main objective of the present study was to investigate arsenate [As (V)] resistance genes in rice cultivars grown in arsenic contaminated Egyptian soil in order to genetically induce resistance against arsenic in the local rice varieties as well as defining contaminated rice grains and/or soil. Three local rice cultivars; Sakha 102-104 were cultivated on modified Murashige and Skoog Basal Medium (MS medium) containing elevated concentrations of arsenate (0.1, 1 and 10 mg/l). The three varieties showed different resistant attitudes against arsenate with Sakha 104 being the most resistant. Extracted messenger RNA (mRNA) from treated and untreated Sakha 104 plantlets was scanned using differential display to demonstrate the arsenate resistant genes using three different arbitrary primers. About 100 different RNAs with (1500 bp - 50 bp) were obtained from which seven were up-regulated genes, subjected to DNA cloning using TOPO TA system and the selected clones were sequenced. The sequence analysis described four genes out of the seven namely disease resistance protein RPM1, Epstein-Barr virus EBNA-1-like, CwfJ family protein and outer membrane lipoprotein OmlA while the other three genes were hypothetical proteins. It is concluded the four induced genes in the resistant rice cultivar considered as a direct response to arsenic soil pollution. Genes detected in the present study can be used as geno-sensors for rice grains and soil contamination with As (V). Moreover, local rice cultivars may be genetically modified with such genes to induce high resistance and to overcome arsenic soil pollution.

Subject Areas

arsenic pollution; differential display; genes; resistance; rice crop; soil contamination

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