Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Oxidation of Human Serum Albumin Exhibits Inter-Individual Variability after an Ultra-Marathon Mountain Race

Version 1 : Received: 14 February 2017 / Approved: 17 February 2017 / Online: 17 February 2017 (15:02:03 CET)

How to cite: Spanidis, Y.; Priftis, A.; Stagos, D.; Stravodimos, G.A.; Leonidas, D.D.; Kouretas, D. Oxidation of Human Serum Albumin Exhibits Inter-Individual Variability after an Ultra-Marathon Mountain Race. Preprints 2017, 2017020070 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201702.0070.v1). Spanidis, Y.; Priftis, A.; Stagos, D.; Stravodimos, G.A.; Leonidas, D.D.; Kouretas, D. Oxidation of Human Serum Albumin Exhibits Inter-Individual Variability after an Ultra-Marathon Mountain Race. Preprints 2017, 2017020070 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201702.0070.v1).

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the oxidation of human serum albumin (HSA) caused by oxidative stress after an exhaustive exercise such as ultra-marathon race. Thus, blood samples from 12 adult runners who underwent a 103 km mountain ultra-marathon race were collected pre- and 24, 48 and 72 h post race. HSA was partially purified using affinity chromatography and then was subjected to Western blot analysis for disulfide dimers determination, indicating oxidation. The results were correlated with those from a previous study in which the same samples were analyzed using different oxidative stress markers and a good correlation with protein carbonyls (PC) at all time points was observed. Moreover there was a significant correlation with static oxidation-reduction potential (sORP) at 24 h, and a negative correlation with capacity oxidation-reduction potential (cORP) at 24 and 48 h. In addition, an individual analysis of albumin dimers exhibited great inter-individual differences. This inter-individual variability in the oxidation of HSA may suggest different interventions (e.g. through diet) in order to confront the effects on athletes’ organism after a strenuous exercise. In conclusion, this study supported the importance of the assessment of albumin dimers as a predictive marker for exercise-induced oxidative stress.

Subject Areas

albumin; oxidative stress; exercise; ultra-marathon mountain race; protein oxidation

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