Preprint Article Version 1 NOT YET PEER-REVIEWED

Calorie Restriction Supplemented with Fish Oil Ameliorates Abnormal Metabolic Status in Middle-Aged Obese Women: An Open-Label, Parallel-Arm, Controlled Trial

Version 1 : Received: 12 August 2016 / Approved: 13 August 2016 / Online: 13 August 2016 (03:39:38 CEST)

How to cite: Utami, F.; Lee, H.; Su, C.; Huang, S. Calorie Restriction Supplemented with Fish Oil Ameliorates Abnormal Metabolic Status in Middle-Aged Obese Women: An Open-Label, Parallel-Arm, Controlled Trial. Preprints 2016, 2016080133 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201608.0133.v1). Utami, F.; Lee, H.; Su, C.; Huang, S. Calorie Restriction Supplemented with Fish Oil Ameliorates Abnormal Metabolic Status in Middle-Aged Obese Women: An Open-Label, Parallel-Arm, Controlled Trial. Preprints 2016, 2016080133 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201608.0133.v1).

Abstract

The increasing prevalence of obesity and sedentary lifestyles has led to an increased incidence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) worldwide. In Taiwan, middle-aged women are at a greater risk of MetS, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease than men are because they have more subcutaneous fat and larger waist circumferences compared to men with equal visceral fat levels. This study investigated the effects of calorie restriction supplemented with fish oil (CRF) in middle-aged women with MetS. For 12 weeks, 75 eligible participants were randomly assigned either calorie restriction (CR) or CRF. Both dietary intervention groups were further divided into two age groups: ≤45 and >45 years. The changes in MetS severity, inflammatory status, iron status, and red blood cell fatty acid profile were evaluated. Seventy-one participants completed the trial. Both dietary interventions significantly ameliorated MetS and improved the participants’ inflammatory status. CR significantly increased total iron binding capacity, whereas CRF increased hepcidin levels. Furthermore, CRF significantly increased the n-6/n-3 and arachidonic acid/docosahexaenoic acid ratios. In conclusion, CR and CRF improved the anthropometric and MetS characteristics of early-middle aged women, including body weight, blood glucose levels, triglyceride levels, as well as the scores for the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and quantitative insulin sensitivity cheque index. Dietary intervention was more effective in >45-year-old women than ≤45-year-old women.

Subject Areas

calorie restriction; PUFA; meal replacement; metabolic syndrome; middle age

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