Preprint Article Version 1 NOT YET PEER-REVIEWED

Simulated and In Situ Frost Heave in Seasonally Frozen Soil from a Cold Temperate Broad-leaved Korean Pine Forest

Version 1 : Received: 1 August 2016 / Approved: 1 August 2016 / Online: 1 August 2016 (09:47:52 CEST)

How to cite: Lin, M.; Wang, A.; Guan, D.; Jin, C.; Wu, J.; Yuan, F. Simulated and In Situ Frost Heave in Seasonally Frozen Soil from a Cold Temperate Broad-leaved Korean Pine Forest. Preprints 2016, 2016080003 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201608.0003.v1). Lin, M.; Wang, A.; Guan, D.; Jin, C.; Wu, J.; Yuan, F. Simulated and In Situ Frost Heave in Seasonally Frozen Soil from a Cold Temperate Broad-leaved Korean Pine Forest. Preprints 2016, 2016080003 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201608.0003.v1).

Abstract

Frost heave, which is the volumetric expansion of frozen soil, has great ecological significance, since it creates water storage spaces in soils at the beginning of the growing season in cold temperate forests. To understand the characteristics of frost heave in seasonally frozen soil and the factors that impact its extent, we investigated the frost heave rates of forest soil from different depths and with different soil moisture contents, using both lab-based simulation and in situ measurement in a broadleaved Korean pine forest in the Changbai Mountains (northeastern China). We found that frost heave was mainly affected by soil moisture content, soil type, and gravitational pressure. Frost heave rate increased linearly with soil moisture content, and for each 100% increase in soil moisture content, the frost heave rate increased by 41.6% (loam, upper layer), 17.2% (albic soil, middle layer), and 4.6% (loess, lower layer). Under the same soil moisture content, the frost heave rate of loam was highest, whereas that of loess was lowest, and the frost heave of the uppermost 15 cm, which is the biologically enriched layer, accounted for ~55% of the frost heave. As a result, we determined the empirical relationship between frost heave and freezing depth, which is important for interpreting the effects of frost heave on increases in the storage space of forest soils and for calculating changes in soil porosity.

Subject Areas

seasonally frozen soil; frost heave; soil moisture content; soil type; freezing depth; soil porosity

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