Preprint Brief Report Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Time of Dinner may Contribute to Keep Majorcan Children Free from Otitis

Version 1 : Received: 22 June 2022 / Approved: 23 June 2022 / Online: 23 June 2022 (10:37:16 CEST)

How to cite: Diez, R.; Verd, S.; Ponce-Taylor, J.; Gutierrez, A.; Llull, M.; Martin-Delgado, M.; Cadevall, O.; Ramakers, J. Time of Dinner may Contribute to Keep Majorcan Children Free from Otitis. Preprints 2022, 2022060324 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202206.0324.v1). Diez, R.; Verd, S.; Ponce-Taylor, J.; Gutierrez, A.; Llull, M.; Martin-Delgado, M.; Cadevall, O.; Ramakers, J. Time of Dinner may Contribute to Keep Majorcan Children Free from Otitis. Preprints 2022, 2022060324 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202206.0324.v1).

Abstract

Running at odds with the timing imposed by the circadian clock plays an important role in the process that leads to communicable and non communicable diseases. The primary objective of this study was to analyse whether early dinner eater children were at lower risks of acute respiratory infections than late dinner eater children, during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted from July to December 2020 on children attending Majorcan emergency services. Clinical data collected included timing, symptoms, laboratory tests and imaging studies of current illness. Each diagnosis was validated by general paediatricians. Our survey on dinner time habits was carried out by using self-administered questionnaires. Results: A total of 669 children under age 18 were included in the study. The median of dinner time was 8:30 pm. Late dinner eaters accounted for a higher proportion of acute otitis media than early dinner eaters (7% vs 3%; P=0.028). Other infectious diseases were not associated with dinner time habits. Conclusions: We make a preliminary estimate of the link between late dinner habits and acute otitis media in children. However, no conclusions about causality can be established due to the observational design of the study.

Keywords

circadian clock; otitis media; late dinner; common cold; Mediterranean diet; oxidative stress; chronotype

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Pediatrics

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