Preprint Article Version 2 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Analysis of Perception, Reasons, and Motivations for COVID-19 Vaccination in People with Diabetes across Sub-Saharan Africa: A Mixed-Method Approach

Version 1 : Received: 8 May 2022 / Approved: 9 May 2022 / Online: 9 May 2022 (04:52:08 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 15 June 2022 / Approved: 15 June 2022 / Online: 15 June 2022 (05:56:25 CEST)

How to cite: Osuagwu, U.L.; Langsi, R.; Ovenseri-Ogbomo, G.; Mashige, K.P.; Abu, E.K.; Envuladu, E.A.; Goson, P.C.; Ekpenyong, B.N.; Oloruntoba, R.; Chundung, M.A.; Charwe, D.D.; Timothy, C.G.; Ishaya, T.; Amiebenomo, O.M.; Lim, D.; Agho, K.E. Analysis of Perception, Reasons, and Motivations for COVID-19 Vaccination in People with Diabetes across Sub-Saharan Africa: A Mixed-Method Approach. Preprints 2022, 2022050099 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202205.0099.v2). Osuagwu, U.L.; Langsi, R.; Ovenseri-Ogbomo, G.; Mashige, K.P.; Abu, E.K.; Envuladu, E.A.; Goson, P.C.; Ekpenyong, B.N.; Oloruntoba, R.; Chundung, M.A.; Charwe, D.D.; Timothy, C.G.; Ishaya, T.; Amiebenomo, O.M.; Lim, D.; Agho, K.E. Analysis of Perception, Reasons, and Motivations for COVID-19 Vaccination in People with Diabetes across Sub-Saharan Africa: A Mixed-Method Approach. Preprints 2022, 2022050099 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202205.0099.v2).

Abstract

Abstract: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with severe COVID-19 infection and complications. This study assessed COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and hesitancy in diabetes and explored reasons for nonvaccinating. This was a web-based cross-sectional survey using a mixed-method approach conducted between March-May 2021 corresponding to most SSA countries' early vaccine rollout period. Participants were those aged ≥18 years with self-reported DM in 11 Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. Responses to comments on reasons for vaccine hesitancy and facilitators for vaccine uptake were analyzed. Of the 73 participants with DM, 65.8% were males older than 35 years (86.3%), had post-secondary education (90%), and a significant proportion was from South Africa (39.7%), Nigeria (28.8%) and Ghana (13.7%). 64.4% had COVID-19 symptoms, 46.6% were tested for COVID-19, of which 19.2% tested positive. Few participants (6.8%) had taken the COVID-19 vaccination, 65.8% were willing to take the vaccine, while 26.0% either refused or hesitated to take the vaccine. The main reasons identified for not taking the vaccine were: advice from religious leaders, concerns about the vaccine safety, its effects, and efficacy, mistrust of the pharmaceutical companies, the conspiracy theories around the vaccines, the process of production, and the personal belief of the participants. However, participants stated they would take the vaccine if given more education about it, receive positive feedback from those vaccinated, are rewarded for taking the vaccine or if vaccination becomes a condition for travel and employment. The findings of this study showed that uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine was very low in this high-risk group. It is imperative that efforts to increase the uptake of vaccines, such as the provision of education and relevant information, are made.

Keywords

diabetes; survey; sub-Saharan Africa; coronavirus; vaccine; hesitancy; refusal; qualitative; lockdown

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Nursing & Health Studies

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 15 June 2022
Commenter: Uchechukwu Osuagwu
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Author
Comment: Deatils were provided on the qualitative section of the study and a section was added in the discussion to highlight the influence of religious leaders on peoples decision to get the COVID-19 vaccines. A new supplmentary figure was added to show the various internet sources used by the participants for information retrieval related to the vaccines
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