Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Living Well As A Muslim Through The Era of Pandemic - A Japan Qualitative Study

Version 1 : Received: 18 April 2022 / Approved: 19 April 2022 / Online: 19 April 2022 (03:49:32 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Ahmad, I.; Masuda, G.; Tomohiko, S.; Shabbir, C.A. Living Well as a Muslim through the Pandemic Era—A Qualitative Study in Japan. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 6020. Ahmad, I.; Masuda, G.; Tomohiko, S.; Shabbir, C.A. Living Well as a Muslim through the Pandemic Era—A Qualitative Study in Japan. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 6020.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 6020
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph19106020

Abstract

This study explored the living situations, financial conditions, religious obligations, and social distancing of Muslims during the covid 19 pandemic. In total, 20 Muslim community members living in the Kanto region were recruited, 15 of them were included in the in-depth qualitative and five in the focus group interviews. The Snowball method was used, and the questionnaires were designed into four themes. The audio/video interviews were conducted via Zoom and NAVIO was used to analyse the data thematically. The major Muslim events were cancelled, and the recommended physical distancing was maintained during the prayers at home and in the mosques. The Japanese government's financial support to each person was a beneficial step towards social protection, which was highlighted and praised by every single participant. Regardless of religious obligations, the closer of all major mosques in Tokyo demonstrates to the Japanese community how serious they are about adhering to the public health guidelines during the pandemic. This study highlighted that the pandemic has affected the religious patterns and behaviour of Muslims from inclusive to exclusive in a community and narrated the significance of religious commitments.

Keywords

Migrants; COVID-19 pandemic; Public Health; Islam

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Other

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