Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Deep Learning Segmentation of Satellite Imagery Identifies Aquatic Vegetation Associated with Snail Intermediate Hosts of Schistosomiasis in Senegal, Africa

Version 1 : Received: 22 February 2022 / Approved: 24 February 2022 / Online: 24 February 2022 (07:38:13 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Liu, Z.Y.-C.; Chamberlin, A.J.; Tallam, K.; Jones, I.J.; Lamore, L.L.; Bauer, J.; Bresciani, M.; Wolfe, C.M.; Casagrandi, R.; Mari, L.; Gatto, M.; Diongue, A.K.; Toure, L.; Rohr, J.R.; Riveau, G.; Jouanard, N.; Wood, C.L.; Sokolow, S.H.; Mandle, L.; Daily, G.; Lambin, E.F.; De Leo, G.A. Deep Learning Segmentation of Satellite Imagery Identifies Aquatic Vegetation Associated with Snail Intermediate Hosts of Schistosomiasis in Senegal, Africa. Remote Sens. 2022, 14, 1345. Liu, Z.Y.-C.; Chamberlin, A.J.; Tallam, K.; Jones, I.J.; Lamore, L.L.; Bauer, J.; Bresciani, M.; Wolfe, C.M.; Casagrandi, R.; Mari, L.; Gatto, M.; Diongue, A.K.; Toure, L.; Rohr, J.R.; Riveau, G.; Jouanard, N.; Wood, C.L.; Sokolow, S.H.; Mandle, L.; Daily, G.; Lambin, E.F.; De Leo, G.A. Deep Learning Segmentation of Satellite Imagery Identifies Aquatic Vegetation Associated with Snail Intermediate Hosts of Schistosomiasis in Senegal, Africa. Remote Sens. 2022, 14, 1345.

Journal reference: Remote Sens. 2022, 14, 1345
DOI: 10.3390/rs14061345

Abstract

Schistosomiasis is a debilitating parasitic disease of poverty that affects more than 200 million people worldwide, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa, and is clearly associated with the construction of dams and water resource management infrastructure in tropical and subtropical areas. Changes to hydrology and salinity linked to water infrastructure development may create conditions favorable to the aquatic vegetation that is suitable habitat for the intermediate snail hosts of schistosome parasites. With thousands of small and large water reservoirs, irrigation canals, and dams developed or under construction in Africa, it is crucial to accurately assess the spatial distribution of high-risk environments that are habitat for freshwater snail intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis in rapidly changing ecosystems. Yet, standard techniques for monitoring snails are labor-intensive, time-consuming, and provide information limited to the small areas that can be manually sampled. Consequently, in low-income countries where schistosomiasis control is most needed, there are formidable challenges to identify potential transmission hotspots for targeted medical and environmental interventions. In this study, we developed a new framework to map the spatial distribution of suitable snail habitat across large spatial scales in the Senegal River Basin by integrating satellite data, high-definition, low-cost drone imagery, and an artificial intelligence (AI)-powered computer vision technique called semantic segmentation. A deep learning model (U-Net) was built to automatically analyze high-resolution satellite imagery to produce segmentation maps of aquatic vegetation, with a fast and robust generalized prediction that proved more accurate than a more commonly used random forest approach. Accurate and up-to-date knowledge of areas at highest risk for disease transmission can increase the effectiveness of control interventions by targeting habitat of disease-carrying snails. With the deployment of this new framework, local governments or health actors might better target environmental interventions to where and when they are most needed in an integrated effort to reach the goal of schistosomiasis elimination.

Keywords

deep learning; U-Net; semantic segmentation; schistosomiasis; aquatic vegetation; Neglected Tropical Diseases; Senegal River Basin

Subject

BIOLOGY, Ecology

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