Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Spatial and Functional Mapping of Spliceosome and Centrosome Proximity Revealed by Proteogenomics Profiling

Version 1 : Received: 5 February 2022 / Approved: 7 February 2022 / Online: 7 February 2022 (12:12:18 CET)

How to cite: Del Grosso, L.; Cerulo, L.; Remo, A.; Franco, B.; Busselez, J.; Pancione, M. Spatial and Functional Mapping of Spliceosome and Centrosome Proximity Revealed by Proteogenomics Profiling . Preprints 2022, 2022020084 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202202.0084.v1). Del Grosso, L.; Cerulo, L.; Remo, A.; Franco, B.; Busselez, J.; Pancione, M. Spatial and Functional Mapping of Spliceosome and Centrosome Proximity Revealed by Proteogenomics Profiling . Preprints 2022, 2022020084 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202202.0084.v1).

Abstract

Ribonucleoproteins (RNP) condensates often contain intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) able to confer an exceptional multifunctionality necessary for gene expression, a process that defines cell types and enables cellular adaptation in metazoans. Centosomes, the microtubule-organizing centers of animal cells, are particularly enriched in disordered proteins but the role of RNPs surrounding the centrosome and the ciliary basal body remains largely unknown. By refining and integrating the existing protein-protein interaction network, spatial proteomics and transcriptomic data, we here report the subcellular and genomic proximity between the spliceosome, a huge nuclear RNP complex that removes introns from a transcribed pre-mRNA, and centrosome/cilia components. We present a comprehensive map of pre-RNA processing factors and other RNA-binding proteins playing a role in the regulation of splicing but localized to the centrosome and cilia. Protein-protein interactions studies reveal that a large number of spliceosome components interact with both centrosome linker and centriolar satellites elements, necessary for cellular division and ciliogenesis. RNAseq data from mouse Embryonic Stem Cells (mESC) and human tissues revealed a co-transcriptional coordination program of splicing and centrosome-related genes with relevance to tissue-specific neurosensory disorders and cancer types. Additionally, we found that centrosome and spliceosome genes form linearly and spatially colocalized genomic loci (CEP250, RBBM39, DHX35, and CTNNBL1) conserved in human and mouse genome, then explaining similarities in co-modification and subcellular distribution. Our results suggest that centrosome and cilia constitute cytoplasmic sites for the exchange of molecular machinery with nucleus, storage of RNA splicing and spliceosome condensates previously unrecognized. These complexes in response to external signals, could play an integral part in ciliogenesis and nuclear division to establish and maintain cellular identity in metazoans.

Keywords

ribonucleoproteins; spliceosome; centrosome; CEP250

Subject

LIFE SCIENCES, Molecular Biology

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