Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Precipitation of Minerals from Water-Rich Fumarolic Gas Using a Flow-through Benchtop Installation

Version 1 : Received: 7 January 2022 / Approved: 10 January 2022 / Online: 10 January 2022 (15:19:35 CET)

How to cite: Zelenski, M.; Taran, Y.; Korneeva, A.; Sandalov, F.; Nekrylov, N. Precipitation of Minerals from Water-Rich Fumarolic Gas Using a Flow-through Benchtop Installation. Preprints 2022, 2022010125 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202201.0125.v1). Zelenski, M.; Taran, Y.; Korneeva, A.; Sandalov, F.; Nekrylov, N. Precipitation of Minerals from Water-Rich Fumarolic Gas Using a Flow-through Benchtop Installation. Preprints 2022, 2022010125 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202201.0125.v1).

Abstract

Volcanic fumaroles are openings in the earth's surface, where volcanic gases discharge to the atmosphere. Metallic and non-metallic elements contained in gases form specific mineral precipitates upon cooling. Although the presence of metals in fumarolic gases has long been known, their concentrations are generally low and difficult to measure directly. A laboratory model of a fumarole may resolve the situation if the complex gas composition could be accurately reproduced. Here we describe a new experimental approach that allows accurately simulating fumarolic gases in terms of their main components (H2O, CO2, S, HCl), as well as adding volatile metal compounds. Gas is generated inside a special flow-through reactor, at the outlet of which the elements contained in the gas form temperature-dependent mineral sequence inside the attached silica-glass tube. Using this installation, we obtained laboratory sublimates from reducing (H2S-rich) gases similar to natural ones in terms of mineral composition and mineral habits. Twenty-one phases have been identified in sublimates, among which are simple and complex chlorides, simple sulfides and six sulfosalts. Comparison of the sublimate deposition from H2O-rich gas at 1 bar with similar works performed in evacuated ampoules at low pressure showed that fumarolic gases behave like an ideal gas, in which molecules do not interact with each other, and reactive compounds in the gas serve in fact as an inert carrier of volatile metals species. Changing the composition of the gas at the outlet of the installation, its flow rate and temperature, we can observe the corresponding changes in mineral precipitates and in such a way study the factors affecting mineral formation on natural fumarolic fields.

Keywords

benchtop fumarole; flow-through reactor; sublimates; volatile metal species; simulation

Subject

EARTH SCIENCES, Geochemistry & Petrology

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