Preprint Brief Report Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The Potential for Healthy Checkout Policies to Advance Nutrition Equity

Version 1 : Received: 1 November 2021 / Approved: 2 November 2021 / Online: 2 November 2021 (22:32:49 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Falbe, J.; White, J.S.; Sigala, D.M.; Grummon, A.H.; Solar, S.E.; Powell, L.M. The Potential for Healthy Checkout Policies to Advance Nutrition Equity. Nutrients 2021, 13, 4181. Falbe, J.; White, J.S.; Sigala, D.M.; Grummon, A.H.; Solar, S.E.; Powell, L.M. The Potential for Healthy Checkout Policies to Advance Nutrition Equity. Nutrients 2021, 13, 4181.

Journal reference: Nutrients 2021, 13, 4181
DOI: 10.3390/nu13114181

Abstract

Background: As the only place in a store where all customers must pass through and wait, the checkout lane may be particularly influential over consumer purchases. Because most foods and beverages sold at checkout are unhealthy (e.g., candy/sweets, sugar-sweetened beverages, and salty snacks), policymakers and advocates have expressed growing interest in healthy checkout policies. To understand the extent to which such policies could improve nutrition equity, we as-sessed the prevalence and sociodemographic correlates of purchasing items from checkout. Methods: We assessed self-reported checkout purchasing and sociodemographic characteristics in a national convenience sample of adults (n=10,348) completing an online survey in 2021. Re-sults: Over one-third (36%) of participants reported purchasing foods or drinks from checkout during their last grocery shopping trip. Purchasing items from checkout was more common among men; adults <55 years of age; low-income consumers; Hispanic, non-Hispanic American Indian and Alaska Native, and non-Hispanic Black consumers; those with at least a bachelor’s degree; parents; and consumers diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes (p-values<0.05). Conclusions: Purchasing foods or beverages from store checkouts is common and more prevalent among low-income and racial and ethnic minority groups. These results suggest that healthy checkout policies have the potential to improve nutrition equity.

Keywords

checkout; policy; product placement; obesity; nutrition; retail; marketing; disparities; race; income.

Subject

MEDICINE & PHARMACOLOGY, Nutrition

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