Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Preventing Multimorbidity with Lifestyle Interventions in Sub-saharan Africa: A New Challenge for Public Health in Low and Middle Income Countries.

Version 1 : Received: 30 September 2021 / Approved: 5 October 2021 / Online: 5 October 2021 (08:04:04 CEST)

How to cite: Alkhatib, A.; Nyanzi, L.A.; Mujuni, B.; Amanya, G.; Ibingira, C. Preventing Multimorbidity with Lifestyle Interventions in Sub-saharan Africa: A New Challenge for Public Health in Low and Middle Income Countries.. Preprints 2021, 2021100067 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202110.0067.v1). Alkhatib, A.; Nyanzi, L.A.; Mujuni, B.; Amanya, G.; Ibingira, C. Preventing Multimorbidity with Lifestyle Interventions in Sub-saharan Africa: A New Challenge for Public Health in Low and Middle Income Countries.. Preprints 2021, 2021100067 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202110.0067.v1).

Abstract

Objectives: Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs) are experiencing a fast-paced epidemiological rise in clusters of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, forming an imminent rise in multimorbidity (MMD). However, preventing MMD has received little attention in LMICs, especially in Sub-Saharan African Countries. Design: Narrative review which scoped the most recent evidence in LMICs about MMD determinants and appropriated them for potential MMD prevention strategies. Methods: MMD in LMICs is affected by several determinants including increased age, female gender, environment, lower socio-economic status, obesity, and lifestyle behavious, especially poor nutrition and physical inactivity. Results: MMD public health interventions in LMICs, especially Sub-Saharan are currently impeded by local and regional economic disparity, underdeveloped healthcare systems, and concurrent prevalence of communicable diseases. However, lifestyle interventions that are targeted towards preventing highly prevalent MMD clusters, especially hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular disease, can provide an early prevention of MMD, especially within Sub-Saharan African countries with emerging economies and socio-economic disparity. Conclusion: Future public health initiatives should consider targeted lifestyle interventions and appropriate policies and guidelines in preventing MMD in LMICs.

Keywords

Multimorbidity; Non-communicable diseases; Lifestyle prevention; Public health; Low and Middle Income Countries

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