Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

A Comparative Analysis of the New Mexico Organic and Conventional Producer: Implications for Occupational Safety and Health Research and Practice

Version 1 : Received: 16 September 2021 / Approved: 20 September 2021 / Online: 20 September 2021 (13:40:18 CEST)

How to cite: Parshall, C.A.; Soto Mas, F.; Qeadan, F. A Comparative Analysis of the New Mexico Organic and Conventional Producer: Implications for Occupational Safety and Health Research and Practice. Preprints 2021, 2021090334 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202109.0334.v1). Parshall, C.A.; Soto Mas, F.; Qeadan, F. A Comparative Analysis of the New Mexico Organic and Conventional Producer: Implications for Occupational Safety and Health Research and Practice. Preprints 2021, 2021090334 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202109.0334.v1).

Abstract

Research indicates that farmers’ demographic characteristics and production practices have safety and health implications. However, current systems do not identify organic farmers independently from conventional farmers, and literature on how organic and conventional farmers compare is very limited. We conducted a secondary analysis of 2012 Census of Agriculture data to compare organic and non-organic farms and principal operators (POs) in New Mexico (NM). Organic farms were smaller in size, and POs of farms with organic sales were significantly younger (55.8±9.5 vs. 60.5±5.5 years) and less experienced (19.5±6.8 vs. 25.2±6.8 years). Significant differences were also found in POs ethnicity, race, and primary occupation. More farms with organic sales had a female PO compared to farms with non-organic sales (27% vs. 19%). Other significant differences related to work arrangements, household income, living conditions, and access to Internet. National surveys and regional studies may not accurately typify and describe the local organic producer, which is essential in order to advance policy, develop health interventions, and properly address occupational safety and risk among organic farmers. This study makes a unique contribution to understanding the importance of surveillance and collecting place-based data that are specific to the organic producer.

Keywords

organic producer; organic practices; surveillance data; health and safety

Subject

LIFE SCIENCES, Other

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