Working Paper Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

M2 Macrophage in Fibrosis and Kidney Graft Rejection

Version 1 : Received: 7 September 2021 / Approved: 8 September 2021 / Online: 8 September 2021 (11:24:31 CEST)

How to cite: Jafari, R.; Dargahi, M.; Taheri, N. M2 Macrophage in Fibrosis and Kidney Graft Rejection. Preprints 2021, 2021090143 Jafari, R.; Dargahi, M.; Taheri, N. M2 Macrophage in Fibrosis and Kidney Graft Rejection. Preprints 2021, 2021090143

Abstract

Commonly macrophages are categorized into M1 and M2 subsets. M1 macrophages are defined as inflammatory cells and may contribute to tissue injury, while, M2 macrophages play a central role in tissue remodeling and control of immune responses. It seems that the existence of these cells in graft location is effective for control of inflammation and improvement of transplantation consequences. Although the relative contribution of M2 cells in organ transplantation is not clear, the accumulation of these cells in acute and chronic injury models of transplantation was shown. In some cases, the depletion of M2 cells leads to the amelioration of disease; however in other causes, skewing the response in M2 cells leads to an augmentation of graft fibrosis and worsening of graft condition. In spite of these findings, the benefits of such strategies and their implications in human disease are not clearly understood. The purpose of this mini-review is to highlight the role of alternatively activated M2-type macrophages in the improvement or reduction of the kidney transplantation outcome.

Keywords

M2 macrophages; Fibrosis; kidney; Graft rejection

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