Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Use of Phentolamine Mesylate in Implant Surgery. Analysis of Adverse Effects and Haemodynamic Changes

Version 1 : Received: 9 August 2021 / Approved: 11 August 2021 / Online: 11 August 2021 (08:59:37 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Vintanel-Moreno, C.; Martínez-González, J.M.; Martínez-Rodríguez, N.; Meniz-García, C.; Leco-Berrocal, I. Use of Phentolamine Mesylate in Implant Surgery: Analysis of Adverse Effects and Haemodynamic Changes. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 3875. Vintanel-Moreno, C.; Martínez-González, J.M.; Martínez-Rodríguez, N.; Meniz-García, C.; Leco-Berrocal, I. Use of Phentolamine Mesylate in Implant Surgery: Analysis of Adverse Effects and Haemodynamic Changes. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 3875.

Journal reference: J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 3875
DOI: 10.3390/jcm10173875

Abstract

The clinical application of Phentolamine Mesylate (PM) as an anaesthetic reversal agent has been documented in paediatric patients and in conservative dentistry, but no studies have been found in implant surgery. A prospective randomised study was conducted in 60 patients eligible for mandibular implant treatment, randomly divided between the Control Group (CG) and Experimental Group (EG), who were administered PM. Haemodynamic changes, adverse effects and patient satisfaction were assessed. No statistically significant differences in haemodynamic changes and postoperative pain were found between CG and EG (p<0.05), except for Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP) which increased slightly in EG, without posing a risk to the patient. There were no differences in the presence of adverse effects between the two groups, except in the CG which presented greater difficulty in chewing and biting (p<0.05) and the EG with greater pain in the injection area (p=0.043). 83.3% of the EG patients would request PM again for future dental treatment. The use of PM offers an alternative in implant surgery, without increasing the risks and increasing the patient's quality of life.

Keywords

Phentolamine Mesylate; dental implants; haemodynamic changes; adverse effects; satisfaction

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.