Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Finding an Effective Treatment for Sustainable Chinese Language Learning in Japan: A Comparative Study on Motivation of Different Ages

Version 1 : Received: 7 August 2021 / Approved: 9 August 2021 / Online: 9 August 2021 (08:58:48 CEST)

How to cite: Cai, Q. Finding an Effective Treatment for Sustainable Chinese Language Learning in Japan: A Comparative Study on Motivation of Different Ages. Preprints 2021, 2021080182 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202108.0182.v1). Cai, Q. Finding an Effective Treatment for Sustainable Chinese Language Learning in Japan: A Comparative Study on Motivation of Different Ages. Preprints 2021, 2021080182 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202108.0182.v1).

Abstract

Sustaining learners’ motivation to keep learning has been concerned for over 60 years in education and SLA. Most research focusing on Japanese university students has contributed lots of theoretical and practical developments, but research focusing on motivations of non-traditional adult learners and those under 18-year-old to learn Chinese is still little even though previous research findings have proved age is one of the key variables influencing learning besides nationalities and Chinese language levels. In order to find an effective treatment for sustainable Chinese language learning in Japan, this study utilized a survey method to analyze the types of Japanese learners’ motivation to learn Chinese via analysis of a moment structures (AMOS), and to compare the differences of the motivation via one-way ANOVA. This study revealed that Japanese learners’ motivation to learn Chinese consists of eight common types, which are “instrumental motivation”, “personal orientation”, “identified regulation”, “Chinese cultural productions”, “integrating into Chinese community”, “external regulation”, “social responsibility”, and “Chinese for academic purposes”. Also, there are similarities and differences existing in the eight motivation types among the Japanese children, adolescents, (non-) traditional adult learners of Chinese as a foreign language (CFL). The findings contribute the understanding of motivation types and differences among the four aged Japanese learners to teachers of teaching Chinese to speakers of other languages (TCSOL), and to future research further exploring how differently aged Japanese learners can have and use a higher motivation as a main drive to learn Chinese language as a lifelong business.

Keywords

motivation for learning Chinese; Japanese learners of Chinese; teaching Chinese to Japanese learners, teaching Chinese to kids and adolescents; teaching Chinese to adults

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