Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Perioperative Outcome in Dogs Undergoing Emergency Abdominal Surgery: A Retrospective Study on 82 Cases (2018-2020)

Version 1 : Received: 26 July 2021 / Approved: 27 July 2021 / Online: 27 July 2021 (14:22:27 CEST)

How to cite: Fages, A.; Soler, C.; Fernández-Salesa, N.; Conte, G.; Degani, M.; Briganti, A. Perioperative Outcome in Dogs Undergoing Emergency Abdominal Surgery: A Retrospective Study on 82 Cases (2018-2020). Preprints 2021, 2021070607 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0607.v1). Fages, A.; Soler, C.; Fernández-Salesa, N.; Conte, G.; Degani, M.; Briganti, A. Perioperative Outcome in Dogs Undergoing Emergency Abdominal Surgery: A Retrospective Study on 82 Cases (2018-2020). Preprints 2021, 2021070607 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0607.v1).

Abstract

Emergency abdominal surgery carries high morbidity and mortality rates in human medicine; however, there is less evidence characterizing the outcome of these surgeries as a single group in dogs. The aim of the study was to characterize the clinical course, associated complications and outcome of dogs undergoing emergency abdominal surgery. A retrospective study was conducted. Dogs undergoing emergency laparotomy were included in the study. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify variables correlated with death and complications. Eighty-two dogs were included in the study. The most common reason for surgery was gastrointestinal foreign body. Overall 15-day mortality rate was 20.7% (17/82). Median (range) length of hospitalization was 3 (0.5 - 15) days. Of the 82 patients, 24 (29.3%) developed major complications and 66 (80.5%) minor complications. Perioperative factors significantly associated with death included tachycardia (P < 0.001), hypothermia (P < 0.001), lactate acidosis (P < 0.001), shock index > 1 (P < 0.001), leukopenia (P < 0.001), thrombocytopenia (P < 0.001) at admission; intraoperative hypotension (P < 0.001) and perioperative use of blood products (P < 0.001). The results of this study suggest that mortality and morbidity rates after emergency abdominal surgery in dogs are high.

Keywords

emergency; laparotomy; surgery; dogs

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