Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Effects of Soil Fertilization on the Allocation of Net Primary Productivity in Tropical Rainforests of Chocó, Colombia

Version 1 : Received: 21 July 2021 / Approved: 22 July 2021 / Online: 22 July 2021 (14:14:30 CEST)

How to cite: Quinto-Mosquera, H.; Valois-Cuesta, H.; Moreno-Hurtado, F. Effects of Soil Fertilization on the Allocation of Net Primary Productivity in Tropical Rainforests of Chocó, Colombia. Preprints 2021, 2021070522 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0522.v1). Quinto-Mosquera, H.; Valois-Cuesta, H.; Moreno-Hurtado, F. Effects of Soil Fertilization on the Allocation of Net Primary Productivity in Tropical Rainforests of Chocó, Colombia. Preprints 2021, 2021070522 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0522.v1).

Abstract

Tropical rainforests have the highest rates of net primary productivity (NPP) of the world. Hypotheses about the effect of edaphic nutrient contents, especially the availability of P, propose that they limit NPP of tropical forests or promote the redistribution of its above and belowground components. However, these hypotheses have not been tested experimentally in highly rainy tropical forests. To test such hypotheses, the effects of soil fertilization on the above and belowground NPP were evaluated in forests of two localities of Chocó (Colombia), one of the rainiest regions of the world. Five fertilization treatments (N, P, K, NPK and Control) were applied, and the above and belowground NPP were determined in permanent plots. There were no significant effects of treatments on total NPP; only the application of N significantly increased litter NPP. Additionally, a redistribution of the above and belowground NPP was found with the application of P, which increased the proportion of fine roots and litter, and decreased the woody components of forest NPP. This change of carbon allocation is interpreted as an ecophysiological mechanism to capture additional nutrients in soils with very low content of available P.

Keywords

Biogeographic Chocó; Carbon balance; Nutritional limitation; Nitrogen; Phosphorus; Potassium

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