Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Diverging from News Media: An Exploratory Study on the Changing Dynamics between Media and Public Attention on Cancer in China from 2011-2020

Version 1 : Received: 8 July 2021 / Approved: 9 July 2021 / Online: 9 July 2021 (15:44:24 CEST)

How to cite: Huang, Y.; Xu, X.; Su, S. Diverging from News Media: An Exploratory Study on the Changing Dynamics between Media and Public Attention on Cancer in China from 2011-2020. Preprints 2021, 2021070230 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0230.v1). Huang, Y.; Xu, X.; Su, S. Diverging from News Media: An Exploratory Study on the Changing Dynamics between Media and Public Attention on Cancer in China from 2011-2020. Preprints 2021, 2021070230 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0230.v1).

Abstract

Over the past decade, China has witnessed fast-paced technological advancements in the media industry, as well as major shifts in the health agenda portrayed in the media. Therefore, a key starting point when discussing health communication lies in whether media attention and public attention towards health issues are structurally aligned, and to what extent the news media guide public attention. Based on data mined from 73,060 sets of the Baidu Search Index and Media Index on 20 terms covering different types of cancer from 2011 to 2020, the Granger test demonstrates that, in the last decade, public attention and media attention towards cancer in China has gone through two distinct phases. During the first phase, 2011-2015, Chinese news media still held the key in transferring the salience of issues on most cancer types to the public. In the second phase, from 2016-2020, public attention towards cancer has gradually diverged from media coverage, mirroring the imbalance and mismatch between the demand of active public and the supply of cancer information from news media. This study provides an overview of the dynamic transition on cancer issues in China over a ten-year span, along with descriptive results on public and media attention towards specific cancer types.

Subject Areas

Cancer; Public Attention; News Media; Granger Causality Test; Data Mining

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